Physical Bitcoins by Casascius

What is the market price of a Physical Bitcoins by Casascius of 5 BTC today?

submitted by felipelalli to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is Bitcoin by Mike Caldwell (creator of casascius coins)

What is Bitcoin by Mike Caldwell (creator of casascius coins) submitted by Jackieknows to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is the best way to sell an uncirculated, funded casascius coin? /r/Bitcoin

What is the best way to sell an uncirculated, funded casascius coin? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Tax question - When selling Casascius for BTC, what is the appropriate way to determine the amount of tax due? /r/Bitcoin

Tax question - When selling Casascius for BTC, what is the appropriate way to determine the amount of tax due? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Partially redeeming a Casascius physical bitcoin - help request

Overview of problem
I have a Casascius physical bitcoin and I am unable to add its digital contents to a wallet. It seems that the key is not the right length or format. I started to get out of my depth with talk of things like a Minikey format.
I removed the hologram when I was given it years ago as I was curious what was under there. I don't want to sell it instead I want to add its 1 BTC value to a wallet so I can partially redeem it and keep the physical brass as a collectible.
What I have observed and tried (apologies in advance for butchering terms)
I've searched several sites, including here and haven't been able to find a current answer for the new style of keys and wallets.
I put the seven character code from the hologram into the casascius.uberbills dot com site and it gives me a 33 character key, tells me it's version 2 and confirms that it has a 1 BTC value
I've tried to import it into a Blockchain wallet but get the error "this private key does not match the watch only address above" when I enter the private key under the hologram. For some reason it seems like a different public address is generated when I enter the 33 char code.
I tried to import it into a Jaxx Liberty wallet but it doesn't recognise the minikey or 33 char code as valid.
I've basically run up against my level of knowledge and don't know what the next steps are of if I'm missing something bleeding obvious. I double and triple checked any data entry because I saw this was a common problem.
I'd really appreciate any help or pointers the community can give me.
Thanks
Edit:
Solution
I followed the advice given by u/murbul in reply to my post
You might struggle to find a wallet that natively supports MINI keys these days since it's an old format that never really took off apart from Casascius coins. So your best bet is to use a tool to convert it to a real private key (starting with 5) and import/sweep that into a wallet.
You can convert it on the Wallet Details tab of https://www.bitaddress.org/ - For 1 BTC I'd be paranoid enough to recommend downloading the source and doing everything offline: https://github.com/pointbiz/bitaddress.org
I used the site and one of the keys generated was one starting with '5' (Private Key WIF). I used this in Jaxx Liberty in the 'Paper Wallet Import' function under tools and it came right across.
I’m very happy.
submitted by PickledNumbat to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Needing some advice on selling casascius coin

I really wish I could holdl this coin, but vet bills are a bitch.
Anyways I have a 2013 fully funded 1 BTC casascius coin, and I am not sure what the best way to sell this collectible piece of bitcoin history. Should I just sell on Ebay (can I even?) or should I just cash out the BTC on the coin? Are there any other auction like sites that could use to maximize my profits?

Thanks in advance
Link in case you are curious what it is
submitted by Esh911 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What can the earlier days of Bitcoin teach us about holding Ethereum?

Recently, I was thinking back to my first exposure to crypto, after talking with a couple of my coworkers who shared their own, more recent experience with me. It was late 2013 when I first bought BTC, but I had heard about Bitcoin a couple of years earlier. I thought the idea of internet money that nobody controlled sounded like a scam, so I stayed clear. I couldn't really understand the value proposition and didn't take the time to understand how it works (hindsight is 20/20).
That started to change in early 2013. I learned much more about Bitcoin, which at the time was the only blockchain of any consequence, and began to understand the trustless nature of this revolutionary technology and how it would change the world. But what drew me in was the price. For those of you who weren't around then, it's worth taking a minute to open up that chart on Coinbase and see what that bump was in the grand scheme of things.
See what now looks like a relatively little blip there in late 2013? That was when Bitcoin went roughly 10x in a month- from a $100 valuation to a $1000 valuation. I signed up for a Coinbase account shortly before Thanksgiving. Over that Thanksgiving, I spent the whole holiday / weekend talking to my family about how revolutionary this technology was- and wow, were they confused and unable to fathom it. To me, it seemed so obvious. Price increases have a way of "revealing" unassailable logic in situations like these.
It took a while for Coinbase to approve my account, but I could hardly wait for that. I was on eBay, seeing if I could buy Casascius Coins. They were appealing to me at the time, because they merged an asset that was completely virtual with something that was tangible. My brain had still not fully accepted paying so much money for something that "didnt' exist" in real life. But the speculation was soaring so high on those coins (double the BTC value or more) that I decided to pass.
Soon thereafter, I finally got access to Coinbase and bought my first Bitcoin for around $900. And then the price dropped, and it kept dropping. But I kept on buying, knowing that this is how asset markets worked. The price was going down, but for something this revolutionary, it would have to eventually go back up...at least that's what I was hoping. I bought all the way down to prices in the low $400s.
And then in June 2014, I abruptly sold them all, at a sizable net loss. Why did I do that? What was going through my mind to make such a rash decision? Well, open that chart back up. The price had cratered down into the $230s and seemed to be stuck at these new lows- it was a winter that started earlier in that year and never ended. And the Mt Gox debacle was completely soul crushing and I really felt that my hopes for the success of a decentralized currency were completely dashed. And back then, there were no other alt coins to FOMO into. It was Bitcoin or (mostly) nothing.
Besides, I had a major home purchase underway and decided that my money was better going into that rather than holding Bitcoin. In hindsight, I sold at what turned out to be the close to the bottom of Bitcoin. And then just look at that chart. A slow and steady increase over years, with $1000 only being reached again in March of this year.
And as we enter Thanksgiving 4 years later, some of you are going to have these same conversations with your own families about Ethereum. I can tell you what some of them are going to say:
"Internet money? I wouldn't invest in something like that. Who controls it? Isn't this just for criminals?"
"Smart contracts? Even if they do work, what's the point of having them when you have regular contracts? And why does XYZ service even need to be decentralized?"
"This whole thing sounds like a bubble. I hope you don't have much money in this..."
So what does all of this teach us about holding Ethereum?
  1. For many of your friends and family next week, it will be the first time they've heard of concepts like smart contracts or even cryptocurrency in any depth, but if Bitcoin is our teacher, it won't be the last. Take the time to explain it, but don't be pushy about it. Plant the seed, walk away, and send articles to them over the course of the next year.
  2. Bitcoin's $1000 moment reminds me of ETH's $420 moment. Many new buyers FOMO'ed in and are still waiting for their returns, with many likely abandoning the path along the way. Most of the actual buyers of Bitcoin in 2013 then were "nerds" who were fascinated by the technology because they were among the few who took the time to understand it and felt comfortable putting large amounts of money into something on the internet. I would suggest that most recent ETH buyers are still in this "nerd" territory, without real mainstream understanding of what it is.
  3. We are in what seems like a "long winter," with ETH stagnant at around $300. But it is unlikely our next big run will take 4 years to develop. I'm thinking a period of 3 to 12 months. The space isn't what it used to be, with massive institutional money coming and a very vibrant and mainstream-accepted development community. Those among you who were smart bought every token they could during the July depression. If that happens again, you know what to do.
  4. Even if we had another Mt Gox style event (I won't name any exchanges or pegged tokens), it would probably not have the same impact as Mt Gox had. The system is much more diverse and resilient against such events now. There would be a drop, but it would be (hopefully) short lived.
  5. If you just hold long enough, the price is very likely to go up. Possibly substantially up. Maybe even life changing amounts up. You understand the technology and the potential. Don't doubt yourself on your original thesis, like I did with Bitcoin a few years ago. The future picture for ETH has only gotten better in recent months.
So learn from Bitcoin, and don't screw this up for yourselves by taking rash actions- driven by impatience or outsized greed. I am not always one for hyperbole, but I am not exaggerating when I say that you may honestly regret it for the rest of your life.
submitted by DCinvestor to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Lightning Network Will Likely Fail Due To Several Possible Reasons

ECONOMIC CASE IS ABSENT FOR MANY TRANSACTIONS
The median Bitcoin (BTC) fee is $14.41 currently. This has gone parabolic in the past few days. So, let’s use a number before this parabolic rise, which was $3.80. Using this number, opening and closing a Lightning Network (LN) channel means that you will pay $7.60 in fees. Most likely, the fee will be much higher for two reasons:
  1. BTC fees have been trending higher all year and will be higher by the time LN is ready
  2. When you are in the shoe store or restaurant, you will likely pay a higher fee so that you are not waiting there for one or more hours for confirmation.
Let’s say hypothetically that Visa or Paypal charges $1 per transaction. This means that Alice and Carol would need to do 8 or more LN transactions, otherwise it would be cheaper to use Visa or Paypal.
But it gets worse. Visa doesn’t charge the customer. To you, Visa and Cash are free. You would have no economic incentive to use BTC and LN.
Also, Visa does not charge $1 per transaction. They charge 3%, which is 60 cents on a $20 widget. Let’s say that merchants discount their widgets by 60 cents for non-Visa purchases, to pass the savings onto the customer. Nevertheless, no one is going to use BTC and LN to buy the widget unless 2 things happen:
  1. they buy more than 13 widgets from the same store ($7.60 divided by 60 cents)
  2. they know ahead of time that they will do this with that same store
This means that if you’re traveling, or want to tip content producers on the internet, you will likely not use BTC and LN. If you and your spouse want to try out a new restaurant, you will not use BTC and LN. If you buy shoes, you will not use BTC and LN.
ROAD BLOCKS FROM INSUFFICIENT FUNDS
Some argue that you do not need to open a channel to everyone, if there’s a route to that merchant. This article explains that if LN is a like a distributed mesh network, then another problem exists:
"third party needs to possess the necessary capital to process the transaction. If Alice and Bob do not have an open channel, and Alice wants to send Bob .5 BTC, they'll both need to be connected to a third party (or a series of 3rd parties). Say if Charles (the third party) only possesses .4 BTC in his respective payment channels with the other users, the transaction will not be able to go through that route. The longer the route, the more likely that a third party does not possess the requisite amount of BTC, thereby making it a useless connection.”
CENTRALIZATION
According to this visualization of LN on testnet, LN will be centralized around major hubs. It might be even more centralized than this visualization if the following are true:
  1. Users will want to connect to large hubs to minimize the number of times they need to open/close channels, which incur fees
  2. LN’s security and usability relies on 100% uptime of relaying parties
  3. Only large hubs with a lot of liquidity will be able to make money
  4. Hubs or intermediary nodes will need to be licensed as money transmitters, centralizing LN to exchanges and banks as large hubs
What will the impact be on censorship-resistance, trust-less and permission-less?
NEED TO BE LICENSED AS MONEY TRANSMITTER
Advocates for LN seem to talk a lot about the technology, but ignore the legalities.
FinCEN defines money transmitters. LN hubs and intermediary nodes seem to satisfy this definition.
Application of FinCEN's Regulations to Persons Administering, Exchanging, or Using Virtual Currencies
“…applicability of the regulations … to persons creating, obtaining, distributing, exchanging, accepting, or transmitting virtual currencies.”
“…an administrator or exchanger is an MSB under FinCEN's regulations, specifically, a money transmitter…”
"An administrator or exchanger that (1) accepts and transmits a convertible virtual currency or (2) buys or sells convertible virtual currency for any reason is a money transmitter under FinCEN's regulations…”
"FinCEN's regulations define the term "money transmitter" as a person that provides money transmission services, or any other person engaged in the transfer of funds. The term "money transmission services" means "the acceptance of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency from one person and the transmission of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency to another location or person by any means.””
"The definition of a money transmitter does not differentiate between real currencies and convertible virtual currencies.”
FinCEN’s regulations for IVTS:
"An “informal value transfer system” refers to any system, mechanism, or network of people that receives money for the purpose of making the funds or an equivalent value payable to a third party in another geographic location, whether or not in the same form.”
“…IVTS… must comply with all BSA registration, recordkeeping, reporting and AML program requirements.
“Money transmitting” occurs when funds are transferred on behalf of the public by any and all means including, but not limited to, transfers within the United States or to locations abroad…regulations require all money transmitting businesses…to register with FinCEN."
Mike Caldwell used to accept and mail bitcoins. Customers sent him bitcoins and he mailed physical bitcoins back or to a designated recipient. There is no exchange from one type of currency to another. FinCEN told him that he needed to be licensed as money transmitter, after which Caldwell stopped mailing out bitcoins.
ARGUMENTS AGAINST NEED FOR LICENSING
Some have argued that LN does not transfer BTC until the channel is closed on the blockchain. This is not a defence, since channels will close on the blockchain.
Some have argued that LN nodes do not take ownership of funds. Is this really true? Is this argument based on a technicality or hoping for a loophole? It seems intuitive that a good prosecutor can easily defeat this argument. Even if this loophole exists, can we count on the government to never close this loophole?
So, will LN hubs and intermediary nodes need to be licensed as money transmitters? If so, then Bob, who is the intermediary between Alice and Carol, will need a license. But Bob won’t have the money nor qualifications. Money transmitters need to pay $25,000 to $1 million, maintain capital levels and are subject to KYC/AML regulations1. In which case, LN will have mainly large hubs, run by financial firms, such as banks and exchanges.
Will the banks want this? Likely. Will they lobby the government to get it? Likely.
Some may be wondering about miners. FinCEN has declared that miners are not money transmitters:
https://coincenter.org/entry/aml-kyc-tokens :
"Subsequent administrative rulings clarified several remaining ambiguities: miners are not money transmitters…"
FinCEN Declares Bitcoin Miners, Investors Aren't Money Transmitters
Some argue that LN nodes will go through Tor and be anonymous. For this to work, will all of the nodes connecting to it, need to run Tor? If so, then how likely will this happen and will all of these people need to run Tor on every device (laptop, phone and tablet)? Furthermore, everyone of these people will be need to be sufficiently tech savvy to download, install and set up Tor. Will the common person be able to do this? Also, will law-abiding nodes, such as retailers or banks, risk their own livelihood by connecting to an illegal node? What is the likelihood of this?
Some argue that unlicensed LN hubs can run in foreign countries. Not true. According to FinCEN: "“Money transmitting” occurs when funds are…transfers within the United States or to locations abroad…” Also, foreign companies are not immune from the laws of other countries which have extradition agreements. The U.S. government has sued European banks over the LIBOR scandal. The U.S. government has charged foreign banks for money laundering and two of those banks pleaded guilty. Furthermore, most countries have similar laws. It is no coincidence that European exchanges comply with KYC/AML.
Will licensed, regulated LN hubs connect to LN nodes behind Tor or in foreign countries? Unlikely. Will Amazon or eBay connect to LN nodes behind Tor or in foreign countries? Unlikely. If you want to buy from Amazon, you’ll likely need to register yourself at a licensed, regulated LN hub, which means you’ll need to provide your identification photo.
Say goodbye to a censorship-resistant, trust-less and permission-less coin.
For a preview of what LN will probably look like, look at Coinbase or other large exchanges. It’s a centralized, regulated and censored hub. Coinbase allows users to send to each other off-chain. Coinbase provides user data to the IRS and disallows users from certain countries to sell BTC. You need to trust that no rogue employee in the exchange will steal your funds, or that a bank will not confiscate your funds as banks did in Cyprus. What if the government provides a list of users, who are late with their tax returns, to Coinbase and tells Coinbase to block those users from making transactions? You need Coinbase’s permission.
This would be the antithesis of why Satoshi created Bitcoin.
NEED TO REPORT TO IRS
The IRS has a definition for “third party settlement organization” and these need to report transactions to the IRS.
Though we do not know for sure yet, it can be argued that LN hubs satisfies this definition. If this is the case, who will be willing to be LN hubs, other than banks and exchanges?
To read about the discussion, go to:
Lightning Hubs Will Need To Report To IRS
COMPLEXITY
All cryptocurrencies are complicated for the common person. You may be tech savvy enough to find a secure wallet and use cryptocurrencies, but the masses are not as tech savvy as you.
LN adds a very complicated and convoluted layer to cryptocurrencies. It is bound to have bugs for years to come and it’s complicated to use. This article provides a good explanation of the complexity. Just from the screenshot of the app, the user now needs to learn additional terms and commands:
“On Chain”
“In Channels”
“In Limbo”
“Your Channel”
“Create Channel”
“CID”
“OPENING”
“PENDING-OPEN”
“Available to Receive”
“PENDING-FORCE-CLOSE”
There are also other things to learn, such as how funds need to be allocated to channels and time locks. Compare this to using your current wallet.
Recently, LN became even more complicated and convoluted. It needs a 3rd layer as well:
Scaling Bitcoin Might Require A Whole 'Nother Layer
How many additional steps does a user need to learn?
ALL COINS PLANNING OFF-CHAIN SCALING ARE AT RISK
Bitcoin Segwit, Litecoin, Vertcoin and possibly others (including Bitcoin Cash) are planning to implement LN or layer 2 scaling. Ethereum is planning to use Raiden Network, which is very similar to LN. If the above is true about LN, then the scaling roadmap for these coins is questionable at best, nullified at worst.
BLOCKSTREAM'S GAME PLAN IS ON TRACK
Blockstream employs several of the lead Bitcoin Core developers. Blockstream has said repeatedly that they want high fees. Quotes and source links can be found here.
Why is Blockstream so adamant on small blocks, high fees and off-chain scaling?
Small blocks, high fees and slow confirmations create demand for off-chain solutions, such as Liquid. Blockstream sells Liquid to exchanges to move Bitcoin quickly on a side-chain. LN will create liquidity hubs, such as exchanges, which will generate traffic and fees for exchanges. With this, exchanges will have a higher need for Liquid. This will be the main way that Blockstream will generate revenue for its investors, who invested $76 million. Otherwise, they can go bankrupt and die.
One of Blockstream’s investors/owners is AXA. AXA’s CEO and Chairman until 2016 was also the Chairman of Bilderberg Group. The Bilderberg Group is run by bankers and politicians (former prime ministers and nation leaders). According to GlobalResearch, Bilderberg Group wants “a One World Government (World Company) with a single, global marketplace…and financially regulated by one ‘World (Central) Bank’ using one global currency.” LN helps Bilderberg Group get one step closer to its goal.
Luke-Jr is one of the lead BTC developers in Core/Blockstream. Regulation of BTC is in-line with his beliefs. He is a big believer in the government, as he believes that the government should tax you and the “State has authority from God”. In fact, he has other radical beliefs as well:
So, having only large, regulated LN hubs is not a failure for Blockstream/Bilderberg. It’s a success. The title of this article should be changed to: "Lightning Will Fail Or Succeed, Depending On Whether You Are Satoshi Or Blockstream/Bilderberg".
SIGNIFICANT ADVANCEMENTS WITH ON-CHAIN SCALING
Meanwhile, some coins such as Ethereum and Bitcoin Cash are pushing ahead with on-chain scaling. Both are looking at Sharding.
Visa handles 2,000 transactions per second on average. Blockstream said that on-chain scaling will not work. The development teams for Bitcoin Cash have shown significant on-chain scaling:
1 GB block running on testnet demonstrates over 10,000 transactions per second:
"we are not going from 1MB to 1GB tomorrow — The purpose of going so high is to prove that it can be done — no second layer is necessary”
"Preliminary Findings Demonstrate Over 10,000 Transactions Per Second"
"Gigablock testnet initiative will likely be implemented first on Bitcoin Cash”
Peter Rizun, Andrew Stone -- 1 GB Block Tests -- Scaling Bitcoin Stanford At 13:55 in this video, Rizun said that he thinks that Visa level can be achieved with a 4-core/16GB machine with better implementations (modifying the code to take advantage of parallelization.)
Bitcoin Cash plans to fix malleability and enable layer 2 solutions:
The Future of “Bitcoin Cash:” An Interview with Bitcoin ABC lead developer Amaury Séchet:
"fixing malleability and enabling Layer 2 solutions will happen”
However, it is questionable if layer 2 will work or is needed.
GOING FORWARD
The four year scaling debate and in-fighting is what caused small blockers (Blockstream) to fork Bitcoin by adding Segwit and big blockers to fork Bitcoin into Bitcoin Cash. Read:
Bitcoin Divorce - Bitcoin [Legacy] vs Bitcoin Cash Explained
It will be interesting to see how they scale going forward.
Scaling will be instrumental in getting network effect and to be widely adopted as a currency. Whichever Coin Has The Most Network Effect Will Take All (Or Most) (BTC has little network effect, and it's shrinking.)
The ability to scale will be key to the long term success of any coin.
submitted by curt00 to btc [link] [comments]

05-23 18:04 - 'Casascius Gold Bar with 1 BTC' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/enayet123 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 7260-7270min

'''
I have a Casascius Gold Bar that I purchased and loaded in 2013. It has every hard fork since then. I don't have the bar in my immediate possession but am looking to know what you guys think it is worth.
Public key: 1GcM16RMaJtZQAjEsFybesX4QVUMZ2ggJS (1GcM16RM)
The message "Reddit May 2019" signed using the original wallet used to load the bar: HO8G218oyCySm6NJ0OMRD4rO8S0e0FdOZdcYlXKDgy17WdDSon4/On3L6PcWe2ZJupVDyijfTcOWnrrvRB74MJI=
[link]1
'''
Casascius Gold Bar with 1 BTC
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: enayet123
1: i.i*gu*.co*/U*5laj*.j*g
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Anyone wanted to buy a Casascius Bitcoin but was afraid to?

so i've been wanting one of these for a while and the thing holding me back is that it is known that the hologram can be removed and reapplied with the average person not being able to tell it was tampered with. Does this idea bother anyone else? A malicious seller could sell a fully "loaded" coin and have done what these hackers did. You check the casascius checker sites and it's unredeemed but unknowingly the seller already has the private key waiting to sweep it after you pay a premium
https://99bitcoins.com/defcon-hacking-conference-casascius-physical-bitcoins-get-cracked/
submitted by lmakeltraln to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lightning Network Will Likely Fail Due To Several Possible Reasons

ECONOMIC CASE IS ABSENT FOR MANY TRANSACTIONS
The median Bitcoin (BTC) fee is $14.41 currently. This has gone parabolic in the past few days. So, let’s use a number before this parabolic rise, which was $3.80. Using this number, opening and closing a Lightning Network (LN) channel means that you will pay $7.60 in fees. Most likely, the fee will be much higher for two reasons:
  1. BTC fees have been trending higher all year and will be higher by the time LN is ready
  2. When you are in the shoe store or restaurant, you will likely pay a higher fee so that you are not waiting there for one or more hours for confirmation.
Let’s say hypothetically that Visa or Paypal charges $1 per transaction. This means that Alice and Carol would need to do 8 or more LN transactions, otherwise it would be cheaper to use Visa or Paypal.
But it gets worse. Visa doesn’t charge the customer. To you, Visa and Cash are free. You would have no economic incentive to use BTC and LN.
Also, Visa does not charge $1 per transaction. They charge 3%, which is 60 cents on a $20 widget. Let’s say that merchants discount their widgets by 60 cents for non-Visa purchases, to pass the savings onto the customer. Nevertheless, no one is going to use BTC and LN to buy the widget unless 2 things happen:
  1. they buy more than 13 widgets from the same store ($7.60 divided by 60 cents)
  2. they know ahead of time that they will do this with that same store
This means that if you’re traveling, or want to tip content producers on the internet, you will likely not use BTC and LN. If you and your spouse want to try out a new restaurant, you will not use BTC and LN. If you buy shoes, you will not use BTC and LN.
ROAD BLOCKS FROM INSUFFICIENT FUNDS
Some argue that you do not need to open a channel to everyone, if there’s a route to that merchant. This article explains that if LN is like a distributed mesh network, then another problem exists:
"third party needs to possess the necessary capital to process the transaction. If Alice and Bob do not have an open channel, and Alice wants to send Bob .5 BTC, they'll both need to be connected to a third party (or a series of 3rd parties). Say if Charles (the third party) only possesses .4 BTC in his respective payment channels with the other users, the transaction will not be able to go through that route. The longer the route, the more likely that a third party does not possess the requisite amount of BTC, thereby making it a useless connection.”
CENTRALIZATION
According to this visualization of LN on testnet, LN will be centralized around major hubs. It might be even more centralized than this visualization if the following are true:
  1. Users will want to connect to large hubs to minimize the number of times they need to open/close channels, which incur fees
  2. LN’s security and usability relies on 100% uptime of relaying parties
  3. Only large hubs with a lot of liquidity will be able to make money
  4. Hubs or intermediary nodes will need to be licensed as money transmitters, centralizing LN to exchanges and banks as large hubs
What will the impact be on censorship-resistance, trust-less and permission-less?
NEED TO BE LICENSED AS MONEY TRANSMITTER
Advocates for LN seem to talk a lot about the technology, but ignore the legalities.
FinCEN defines money transmitters. LN hubs and intermediary nodes seem to satisfy this definition.
Application of FinCEN's Regulations to Persons Administering, Exchanging, or Using Virtual Currencies
“…applicability of the regulations … to persons creating, obtaining, distributing, exchanging, accepting, or transmitting virtual currencies.”
“…an administrator or exchanger is an MSB under FinCEN's regulations, specifically, a money transmitter…”
"An administrator or exchanger that (1) accepts and transmits a convertible virtual currency or (2) buys or sells convertible virtual currency for any reason is a money transmitter under FinCEN's regulations…”
"FinCEN's regulations define the term "money transmitter" as a person that provides money transmission services, or any other person engaged in the transfer of funds. The term "money transmission services" means "the acceptance of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency from one person and the transmission of currency, funds, or other value that substitutes for currency to another location or person by any means.””
"The definition of a money transmitter does not differentiate between real currencies and convertible virtual currencies.”
FinCEN’s regulations for IVTS:
"An “informal value transfer system” refers to any system, mechanism, or network of people that receives money for the purpose of making the funds or an equivalent value payable to a third party in another geographic location, whether or not in the same form.”
“…IVTS… must comply with all BSA registration, recordkeeping, reporting and AML program requirements.
“Money transmitting” occurs when funds are transferred on behalf of the public by any and all means including, but not limited to, transfers within the United States or to locations abroad…regulations require all money transmitting businesses…to register with FinCEN."
Mike Caldwell used to accept and mail bitcoins. Customers sent him bitcoins and he mailed physical bitcoins back or to a designated recipient. There is no exchange from one type of currency to another. FinCEN told him that he needed to be licensed as money transmitter, after which Caldwell stopped mailing out bitcoins.
ARGUMENTS AGAINST NEED FOR LICENSING
Some have argued that LN does not transfer BTC until the channel is closed on the blockchain. This is not a defence, since channels will close on the blockchain.
Some have argued that LN nodes do not take ownership of funds. Is this really true? Is this argument based on a technicality or hoping for a loophole? It seems intuitive that a good prosecutor can easily defeat this argument. Even if this loophole exists, can we count on the government to never close this loophole?
So, will LN hubs and intermediary nodes need to be licensed as money transmitters? If so, then Bob, who is the intermediary between Alice and Carol, will need a license. But Bob won’t have the money nor qualifications. Money transmitters need to pay $25,000 to $1 million, maintain capital levels and are subject to KYC/AML regulations1. In which case, LN will have mainly large hubs, run by financial firms, such as banks and exchanges.
Will the banks want this? Likely. Will they lobby the government to get it? Likely.
Some may be wondering about miners. FinCEN has declared that miners are not money transmitters:
https://coincenter.org/entry/aml-kyc-tokens :
"Subsequent administrative rulings clarified several remaining ambiguities: miners are not money transmitters…"
FinCEN Declares Bitcoin Miners, Investors Aren't Money Transmitters
Some argue that LN nodes will go through Tor and be anonymous. For this to work, will all of the nodes connecting to it, need to run Tor? If so, then how likely will this happen and will all of these people need to run Tor on every device (laptop, phone and tablet)? Furthermore, everyone of these people will be need to be sufficiently tech savvy to download, install and set up Tor. Will the common person be able to do this? Also, will law-abiding nodes, such as retailers or banks, risk their own livelihood by connecting to an illegal node? What is the likelihood of this?
Some argue that unlicensed LN hubs can run in foreign countries. Not true. According to FinCEN: "“Money transmitting” occurs when funds are…transfers within the United States or to locations abroad…” Also, foreign companies are not immune from the laws of other countries which have extradition agreements. The U.S. government has sued European banks over the LIBOR scandal. The U.S. government has charged foreign banks for money laundering and two of those banks pleaded guilty. Furthermore, most countries have similar laws. It is no coincidence that European exchanges comply with KYC/AML.
Will licensed, regulated LN hubs connect to LN nodes behind Tor or in foreign countries? Unlikely. Will Amazon or eBay connect to LN nodes behind Tor or in foreign countries? Unlikely. If you want to buy from Amazon, you’ll likely need to register yourself at a licensed, regulated LN hub, which means you’ll need to provide your identification photo.
Say goodbye to a censorship-resistant, trust-less and permission-less coin.
For a preview of what LN will probably look like, look at Coinbase or other large exchanges. It’s a centralized, regulated and censored hub. Coinbase allows users to send to each other off-chain. Coinbase provides user data to the IRS and disallows users from certain countries to sell BTC. You need to trust that no rogue employee in the exchange will steal your funds, or that a bank will not confiscate your funds as banks did in Cyprus. What if the government provides a list of users, who are late with their tax returns, to Coinbase and tells Coinbase to block those users from making transactions? You need Coinbase’s permission.
This would be the antithesis of why Satoshi created Bitcoin.
NEED TO REPORT TO IRS
The IRS has a definition for “third party settlement organization” and these need to report transactions to the IRS.
Though we do not know for sure yet, it can be argued that LN hubs satisfies this definition. If this is the case, who will be willing to be LN hubs, other than banks and exchanges?
To read about the discussion, go to:
Lightning Hubs Will Need To Report To IRS
COMPLEXITY
All cryptocurrencies are complicated for the common person. You may be tech savvy enough to find a secure wallet and use cryptocurrencies, but the masses are not as tech savvy as you.
LN adds a very complicated and convoluted layer to cryptocurrencies. It is bound to have bugs for years to come and it’s complicated to use. This article provides a good explanation of the complexity. Just from the screenshot of the app, the user now needs to learn additional terms and commands:
“On Chain”
“In Channels”
“In Limbo”
“Your Channel”
“Create Channel”
“CID”
“OPENING”
“PENDING-OPEN”
“Available to Receive”
“PENDING-FORCE-CLOSE”
There are also other things to learn, such as how funds need to be allocated to channels and time locks. Compare this to using your current wallet.
Recently, LN became even more complicated and convoluted. It needs a 3rd layer as well:
Scaling Bitcoin Might Require A Whole 'Nother Layer
How many additional steps does a user need to learn?
ALL COINS PLANNING OFF-CHAIN SCALING ARE AT RISK
Bitcoin Segwit, Litecoin, Vertcoin and possibly others (including Bitcoin Cash) are planning to implement LN or layer 2 scaling. Ethereum is planning to use Raiden Network, which is very similar to LN. If the above is true about LN, then the scaling roadmap for these coins is questionable at best, nullified at worst.
BLOCKSTREAM'S GAME PLAN IS ON TRACK
Blockstream employs several of the lead Bitcoin Core developers. Blockstream has said repeatedly that they want high fees. Quotes and source links can be found here.
Why is Blockstream so adamant on small blocks, high fees and off-chain scaling?
Small blocks, high fees and slow confirmations create demand for off-chain solutions, such as Liquid. Blockstream sells Liquid to exchanges to move Bitcoin quickly on a side-chain. LN will create liquidity hubs, such as exchanges, which will generate traffic and fees for exchanges. With this, exchanges will have a higher need for Liquid. This will be the main way that Blockstream will generate revenue for its investors, who invested $76 million. Otherwise, they can go bankrupt and die.
One of Blockstream’s investors/owners is AXA. AXA’s CEO and Chairman until 2016 was also the Chairman of Bilderberg Group. The Bilderberg Group is run by bankers and politicians (former prime ministers and nation leaders). According to GlobalResearch, Bilderberg Group wants “a One World Government (World Company) with a single, global marketplace…and financially regulated by one ‘World (Central) Bank’ using one global currency.” LN helps Bilderberg Group get one step closer to its goal.
Luke-Jr is one of the lead BTC developers in Core/Blockstream. Regulation of BTC is in-line with his beliefs. He is a big believer in the government, as he believes that the government should tax you and the “State has authority from God”. In fact, he has other radical beliefs as well:
So, having only large, regulated LN hubs is not a failure for Blockstream/Bilderberg. It’s a success. The title of this article should be changed to: "Lightning Will Fail Or Succeed, Depending On Whether You Are Satoshi Or Blockstream/Bilderberg".
SIGNIFICANT ADVANCEMENTS WITH ON-CHAIN SCALING
Meanwhile, some coins such as Ethereum and Bitcoin Cash are pushing ahead with on-chain scaling. Both are looking at Sharding.
Visa handles 2,000 transactions per second on average. Blockstream said that on-chain scaling will not work. The development teams for Bitcoin Cash have shown significant on-chain scaling:
1 GB block running on testnet demonstrates over 10,000 transactions per second:
"we are not going from 1MB to 1GB tomorrow — The purpose of going so high is to prove that it can be done — no second layer is necessary”
"Preliminary Findings Demonstrate Over 10,000 Transactions Per Second"
"Gigablock testnet initiative will likely be implemented first on Bitcoin Cash”
Peter Rizun, Andrew Stone -- 1 GB Block Tests -- Scaling Bitcoin Stanford At 13:55 in this video, Rizun said that he thinks that Visa level can be achieved with a 4-core/16GB machine with better implementations (modifying the code to take advantage of parallelization.)
Bitcoin Cash plans to fix malleability and enable layer 2 solutions:
The Future of “Bitcoin Cash:” An Interview with Bitcoin ABC lead developer Amaury Séchet:
"fixing malleability and enabling Layer 2 solutions will happen”
However, it is questionable if layer 2 will work or is needed.
GOING FORWARD
The four year scaling debate and in-fighting is what caused small blockers (Blockstream) to fork Bitcoin by adding Segwit and big blockers to fork Bitcoin into Bitcoin Cash. Read:
Bitcoin Divorce - Bitcoin [Legacy] vs Bitcoin Cash Explained
It will be interesting to see how they scale going forward.
Scaling will be instrumental in getting network effect and to be widely adopted as a currency. Whichever Coin Has The Most Network Effect Will Take All (Or Most) (BTC has little network effect, and it's shrinking.)
The ability to scale will be key to the long term success of any coin.
submitted by curt00 to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

I'm poor and currently own One Casascius Bitcoin and Fifty Five Dash. Advice one what I should be doing with it?

A long time ago a friend of mine introduced me to Bitcoin and I bought 6 of them for $50 a piece. When the price doubled I sold half and got my original investment out. Since then I've traded a little and lost some but ended up owning 1 physical Casascius Bitcoin and 55 DASH. I've held on to this amount for years now. I had some money saved up and quit my dead end job to finish studying for the CCNA exam and am now left wondering what to do with it. I currently have enough saved to live on for the next 6 months but I cant decide what to do with these coins? Any advice? I could sell them all, 15K each week till they were gone. I could sell all but 20%. I could sell all the DASH and keep the physical Bitcoin, which is hard to sell. I can't decide what to do. Each time I've sold a little I end up regretting it, but holding on to them makes me worry. That in six months they may no little value when I need them too. Of course, I should have the CCNA done and a new job by then. Any advice is appreciated.
submitted by lotusfox to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Trader’s Guide to Bitcoin Cash & Bitcoin Segwit. A must read.

https://medium.com/@shludvigsen/traders-guide-to-bitcoin-cash-bitcoin-segwit-819933694b34
Check this guy out: Stein Håvard Ludvigsen. This is what he said that article, link above:
"Teaser: Bitcoin Cash can not go to zero value, but Bitcoin Segwit can. To understand how to bet on Bitcoin Cash or Bitcoin Segwit, I will explore the extreme edge cases, why bitcoin will converge on one chain and the fundamentals of the two chains.
I consider “bitcoin” to be the most work chain with either the rules of Bitcoin Cash (BC) or Bitcoin Segwit (BS). Currently, this chain is BS. But it could change to BC.
I am not going to dive into the differences of the two movements behind each chain, what mining is, etc. I will try to shed some light on stuff many bitcoin interested people might have not seen and give them a better platform to trade the chain split in a long term perspective. This is not a bitcoin 101 course.
So I assume you know how the difficulty adjustment (DA) in bitcoin works. BC also has an emergency difficulty adjustment (EDA). EDA works like this: If there has not been mined more than 6 blocks the last 12 hours, the difficulty will be reduced by 20%. The conditions for EDA is evaluated for every block, meaning you could have several blocks in a row reducing the difficulty by 20% each time. EDA make it possible for a very fast reduction of difficulty. The game changer
EDA is the game changer. The implications of it is far reaching. If EDA was not introduced in BC, I think most people would see BC in rigor mortis today. EDA is the difference between the possibility of chain death or not.
So what exactly is a chain death? It is the situation where there is not enough hashpower to mine enough blocks to reach the next DA. It’s just too expensive, and no point in doing it. The whole chain grinds to a halt. It is no longer possible to perform a transaction on chain. In this case, the value of the token becomes zero. Because you can’t use it. (Fun fact: Maybe it’s possible to sell Casascius coins, but they are just collectible items and not the way bitcoin is supposed to work.)
BC can not die because it has EDA. BS can die because it doesn’t have EDA. BC’s value can not go to zero. BS’s value can go to zero. Death by Dumping is impossible
It is not possible to dump a working crypto currency to death. Some whales on the BS side in the blocksize debate have suggested that they can kill BC by dumping it over a long period of time. But it is just as impossible as it is for the IMF to buy all bitcoin in the world. The dumpers will just run out of BC to dump, followed by a new price discovery. As long as the chain is maintained by miners and working, it is not possible to buy everything or dump it to zero. Convergence to one chain
The bitcoin split is very different from the Ethereum split. Ethereum do DA for every block and is like EDA on steroids. This makes it possible for ETH and ETC to live side by side, one big in value, one small in value. A miner makes approximately the same whether he mines ETC or ETH. If prices change, miners shift their hashpower, difficulty change immediately on both chains and everything is back in balance. It’s like if the elephant in the picture on the top of this article was standing on the ground with all four feet, while wind (price) blows on it. It just leans a little into the wind.
Bitcoin is very different. Under normal conditions, it’s 2 weeks (2016 blocks, 10 minutes per block) between each DA.
Right now, a group of miners are mining at a loss on the BC chain. They are pushing very hard against the elephant leaning against them. They do it because they want to change bitcoin and they have a long term perspective.
I call this charity mining. Not because they are not greedy (they should be greedy), but because they do long term investments that could benefit all miners, not just themselves. They believe a 1MB cap on blocks is ridiculous and preventing adoption.
Their goal is to “hold the elephant” until the next DA. They are assisted by the EDA. The heaviest work, the first 6 blocks, is already done.
Some people speculate that hostile miners are mining BC to keep the hashrate above 8% to prevent the EDA to kick in. An attack like this, however, will only postpone the DA to 2–3 months maximum. The attacker will actually do his enemies a favor. They can just relax and mine BS with profit while the attacker holds the elephant.
This elephant pushing is not sustainable. It costs a lot of money. That is why the chains will converge on one chain, unlike Ethereum. The elephant will eventually fall on it’s face or it’s ass. And it’s going to stay like that. Nobody can move it after the fall. It’s a good thing for bitcoin as a whole.
BS is very vulnerable in this asymetric game because BS doesn’t have EDA. BS is under a constant threat of a gold rush when BC becomes more profitable to mine than BS. All BC-supporting miners need to do, is to lower the difficulty by mining BS until it’s profitable to mine BC. The fundamental differences between BC and BS
The fundamentals will win the market in the long run. When it’s allowed to run long.
I’ll keep it short, but I think the fundamental differences between the chains are the following:
More people using bitcoin: BC Yes, BS No Cheap transactions: BC Yes, BS No Fast transactions: BC Yes, BS No Reliable transactions: BC Yes, BS No Privacy: BC Yes, BS No (because of fees related to mixers) Fungibility: BC Yes, BS No (because of fees related to mixers) Vulnerability to dev centralization: BC No, BS Yes (BC = many teams, BS = 1) Level 2 compatibility: BC Yes (in time), BS Yes (in time) It’s your decision
Right now, 1 BS can buy over 10 BC. Gentlemen, place your bets!"
submitted by SoulripOver to btc [link] [comments]

Basic Bitcoin security guide

Hello,
This post is to give you a quick introduction into Bitcoin security. While nobody can guarantee you 100% security, I hope to mitigate some problems you can run into. This is the “20% of effort to get you to 80% safe”.
First of all, you have to determine how much money you want to hold in Bitcoin and how much effort are you willing to put in. If you are happy just holding a few dollars worth and don’t care if you lose them, that’s one approach to take. For everyone else, lets get started.
Password strength
A lot of the times how secure your money is will be determined by the strength of your password. Since in the worst case scenario we are talking about someone trying to brute force your wallet, casual online passwords are too weak. Under 10 characters is too weak. Common words and phrases are too weak. Adding one number to a password at the end is too weak.
Moreover, you can consider your password much weaker if you:
If you want a really strong password:
Wallet security
Now we are getting to the meat of things.
There are a number of wallets available to store your hard earned bitcoins. If you have a decent amount of coins to store, you should look into software wallets - BitcoinQT, MultiBit, Armory or Electrum. They are among the best place to store your money safely (provided your computer is secure as well). Chose one you think best suits you, install it and encrypt your wallet file with your strong password. You should take your wallet file and back it up (location of the file is different for different clients, so you have to do some research as to where to find that file). Back it up on a CD, safe USB drive or the like. Keep them safe. If you lose that file, you will lose your money.
A quick word on deterministic wallets. Electrum and Armory allow you to create wallets from a seed. If you use the same seed later, you can recreate your wallet on other machines. With deterministic wallets, you only need to keep that seed secure to have access to your money.
In comparison, in BitcoinQT's traditional wallet, every address you use is random, meaning that after you send 50-100 outgoing transactions your backups can be obsolete. Always keep an up-to-date backup of such wallet file if possible.
Okay, sometimes you need to have your Bitcoins with you when you leave your computer. In this case, you should look into either online or mobile wallets. A staple for both of those is Blockchain.info, but there are others to chose from.
A good rule of thumb with these is to not store more money in them than you can afford to lose. They are best used as a convenient way of accessing some money, not storing your savings. Online wallets are especially vulnerable to their servers getting hacked and people’s money getting stolen.
What to keep in mind while using online wallets:
  • Use a secure password (the more money you have in them the stronger the password should be)
  • Always keep a backup of your wallet in case you need to recover your money
  • Whenever possible, enable two factor authentication
  • Don’t use your online wallets from unsafe computers
Cold storage
Sometimes you want to store your bitcoins for a long time in a safe place. This is called “cold storage”. There are a few ways one can do this.
First of all, paper wallets. They are nice for giving people small bitcoin gifts, but also for long-term storage if properly used. What you want to do is generate and print them offline. You can save the linked page for example and run that offline. If you are really paranoid, you can put it on read-only media and access that from a different computer. For really long term storage, use archival-grade paper.
Another approach to take is using a separate computer for storing your money that is offline 99+% of the time. You could set one up easily by buying an old laptop, reformatting it, installing Linux and a Bitcoin client. Generate an address on that machine and send money to it from your main wallet. Depending on how paranoid you are you can connect that computer to the Internet afterwards to synchronize data with the Bitcoin Network and then turn it off and put it away somewhere safe until it’s needed.
Brain wallets
Don’t. They are not for you. Unless you are a security-conscientious programmer, those are not for you.
Diversifying
Keeping all of your eggs in one basket is never a good thing. You should look into diversifying some of your Bitcoin assets in case your other storage methods fail. Some ways you can diversify:
  • Buy a physical Bitcoin. As long as you trust the coin creator such coins can be an effective cold storage
  • Invest - I wouldn’t recommend this for more than some trivial amount unless you know what you are doing, but investing in some Bitcoin stocks could be a way to get more money out of your bitcoins
How not to diversify:
  • Avoid keeping your bitcoins at exchanges or other online sites that are not your online wallets. Such sites can be closed down or disappear along with your money.
  • Alt-coins - there are few cryptocurrencies that are worthwhile, but most of them are just Bitcoin clones. If a currency brings nothing new, it’s worthless in comparison to Bitcoin. Namecoin is a distributed domain name server (although recently it had a fatal flaw uncovered, so be warned), Ripple is a distributed currency exchange and payment system. Litecoin will only be useful in case Bitcoin’s hashing algorithm gets compromised (very unlikely at this time). Beyond that there are few if any alt-coins that are a worthwhile way of diversifying.
Accepting payments and safety
We’ve covered safe ways to store money, now a quick note about bitcoin payments and their safety.
First of all, when you are sending a transaction, pay your fees. Transactions without fees can take forever to propagate, confirm and clear. This can cause you a lot of stress, so pay your fees.
Secondly, when accepting large Bitcoin payments (say you want to suddenly cash in a gold bar into bitcoins), wait for at the very least 1 confirmation on those transactions. 6 is best, but having even 1 confirmations is a lot better than having none. This is mainly a rule of thumb for the paranoid (I wouldn’t be doing this for most casual transaction), but maybe it will save you if you are dealing with some shady people.
Wrapping up...
That should cover the basics. If you want to read more about Bitcoin’s security in general, here is my master thesis on the subject. A lot of questions about Bitcoin and security have also been answered on Bitcoin StackExchange - be sure to check it out.
Comments and improvement suggestions welcome.
EDITS:
  • Removed link to insecure site
  • Removed random article section
  • Added information about deterministic wallets
submitted by ThePiachu to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

To arms Bitcoin community! Help us to complete this mining installation for the Zürich MoneyMuseum. We are not asking for funds. Only your expertise needed! 20$ tip if you give us the relevant clue to solve or mitigate our main problem. Nice pictures of the exhibition inside as well…

Edit:
A big thank you to all people who helped us we can now mine true pps with diff1! The people in this thread which have helped most have been awarded. I want to mention also the operator of btcmp.com denis2342 and Luke-Jr.
Actually looking at the miner screen in the Linux terminal helped a lot ;-). The pool constantly resigned to stratum with variable difficulty. We can now mine true pps with diff1. Getwork with long polling seems to be default after disabling stratum...
We will probably post again, when there is a video of the installation in action...
Again many thanks. Learned a lot.
Edit: Thank you for all the answeres so far! We will try different things now and report back. Tip bounty will be distrubuted as soon as we found out what finally does the trick. Ths could take a few days. The offerd tip will be distributed and very likeley a few others as well.
First of all, let me tell you that the Bitcoin Exhibition at the Zürich MoneyMuseum is most likely the biggest and most diverse of it’s kind. Please read more about the museum and the exhibition below.
Help us solve the following problem we experience with our “Muscle Powered Proof of Work” installation:
Me and a friend have invested a lot of time to build an installation for the Museum. It is basically a 10GHash/s miner and RapberryPi which is powered by a hand generator (Maxon DC motor with planetary gear). Here are some pictures of the installation, although not entirely put together yet. There are still some changes planned.
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0qcvl3wu4romhnt/AAAYF08lnVAy6W6KEepE7e2Ua?dl=0
Now let’s get to the core of our problem:
We are mining at the getwork diff1 pool btcmp.com as it is a true pps pool with getwork diff1. The visitors in the museum can power the generator for 2-3min and see directly how many Satoshis the "network" (actually pool but we don't want to confuse the visitors to much at that point) has given the museum for their work. This all works well so far but one problem remains. Sometimes the pool does not get a share from us for more than 40 seconds or even more than 60 in some cases. I have calculated that with 8.4 GHash/s we should find a share about every 0.5 seconds in average (diff1). I think when the pool gets a share it gets all the hashes as it then accounts for several Satoshis. Statistically we get per minute what we should get in theory. We would very much like to lower the time between the accepted shares by the pool, however. This would help to make the overall experience much smoother for the visitors.
Please look at this screenshot from MinePeon and answer some questions:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/lb1jei4trc9kqe5/MinePeonScreenshot.png?dl=0
We see that we get a lot of diff1 hashes. However, only 11 shares/packages have been accepted. The Is there a possibility to set the miner SW so it submits to the pool as soon as a share is found? It seems to send them in packages which sometimes have 4-5 seconds in between but sometimes a much as 80 seconds. I would like to submit packages of hashes much more often. How can this be influenced?
What exactly are the Getworks (GW)?
What exactly are the Accepted ones (Acc)? This is where the TipBounty is. Help us to get a better Acc/diff1 ratio. Best would be 1:1.
What exactly are the rejected ones (Rej)?
What exactly are the discarded ones (Disc)?
What exactly are the difficulty one hashes (diff1)?
Now some of these questions seem very very basic but it is important for us to understand what these are and how we can influence these. We have a 1:1 correlation between the Acc and the pool side acknowledgement of shares/packages. So whenever the MinePeon shows one more for this value the pool value for last submitted share goes to “moments ago”.
Does the miner SW have a setting where we can set after how many diff1 hashes a package of hashes is sent to the pool? If no, do you have another idea why so few are sent? Ideally we would set it so the diff1 hashes are sent every 5 seconds or so, probably even more often.
Is stratum with fixed diff1 possible? If so, would it be better to use stratum?
Are there critical settings if we should know of? (we have tried --request-diff and --no-submit-stale)
We are using BFGMiner on MinePeon if that matters. We could switch to CGMiner if that would help. Any help is very much appreciated. The museum is doing a great job explaining Bitcoin basics. We had special focus on interactive learning and have several things to underline this.
I hope to hear back from you so we can improve our installation. Please don't hesitate to ask if you have further questions. We are both not mining experts.
Thanks for reading and AMA.
SimonBelmond
Current features of the Bitcoin exhibition at the Zürich MoneyMuseum:
Current Features:
  • Life screen with various stats/charts/parameters/transactions…
  • Printed infographics.
  • Muscle powered PoW: Hand generator with 5v and 3.5-5A output, Raspberry Pi, MinePeon, 5x Antminer U2+ plus a screen to show the hash-rate at the pool and/or in MinePeon web interface. This screen will not be hand powered. This installation will complement their coining die (go to 1:27 to see what I mean).
  • The Bitcoin mining evolution (CPU, GPU, FPGA, ASIC)
  • A few short (2-3 minutes) interviews.
  • Other wallets, Trezor, PiperWallet
  • ATM Prototype, functional
  • MoneyMuseum Bit-Cards
  • PiperWallet to use.
  • Casascius and other physical Bitcoins, Wallets (also some commemorative coins), Paper wallet like one out of the first Bitcoin (A)TM ever
  • Bitcoin Quiz
  • 12 Picture tours
    • Bitcoin for beginners
    • Bitcoin advanced
    • Debunking 13 Bitcoin myths
    • What you definitely have to know
    • The history of Bitcoin
    • Bitcoin und traditional forms of money
    • Alternatives to Bitcoin
    • Citations about Bitcoin
    • How do I open an account?
    • How do I get Bitcoin?
    • Bitcoin community and economy
    • Bitcoin as a platform
I see this as a good opportunity for Bitcoin, so let’s embrace it. I am especially excited to compare the traditional forms of money which used proof of work to the new money which also uses proof of work. I think in that context it will be much easier for the visitors to value this concept.
A lot of schools and other groups book guided tours at the museum. It is open on every Friday from December 05. On. Entry is free of charge.
Edit:Markdown, typos
submitted by SimonBelmond to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

It's my cake day! I'm ready to celebrate by sharing with some new bitcoiners!

Giveaway Status: Tips have been distributed. I'm out! Sorry!
I'm interested in giving some bitcoin to redditors who have never used it before...
There are 4 ways to win cakeday prizes: The giveaway has concluded.
1.
2.
3.
4.
Caveats
  1. I'm leaving the house to go sledding. I won't be responding for an hour or two. Please don't flip out if I don't tip immediately.
  2. I have .21 BTC (about $50 USD) to tip. Tips will not exceed this.
  3. I have the final say in who gets what. If you'll be butthurt because I didn't tip you, then just move along. If I change my mind or get hit by a bus you ought to be happy with your contribution regardless of a tip.
  4. I reserve the right to change the terms of this giveaway at any time for any reason.
  5. I will update the thread if any terms change.
  6. Each user can probably only claim one tip.
Origin Story:
A couple of people have asked who I am that I can afford to be generous with bitcoin. Maybe my username makes it a bit mysterious. I got hooked on bitcoin the first time I saw a mention of it on April 19, 2011. I did some GPU mining and eventually sold or gave away most of my coins in the form of Casascius coins that same year. When BFL announced ASIC miners, I spent all of my remaining coins on BFL ASICS and more or less lost everything. I currently hold fewer coins than anyone would guess. Regardless of my personal experience I am a technophile and I believe bitcoin will revolutionize the world (in time). I realize I'm not going to be rich when this happens, but it's enough to be a part of it - and I want others to join me on this exciting ride. I chose the "secret_bitcoin_login" username two years ago because I was alienating a lot of my regular reddit friends by ranting on and on about bitcoin - setting up this account helped me to containerize my thoughts and talk about bitcoin as much as I wanted to. I believe in strong and positive community, so I spend a lot of my time sharing and encouraging others. The $50 I am sharing today isn't "free money", it's part of my earned wages that I used to buy bitcoin from coinbase to share with you all.
submitted by secret_bitcoin_login to FreeBits [link] [comments]

'What's wrong with my current cold storage method?' - an examination of potential weaknesses in the most common cold storage methods

Today we are going to discuss cold storage and some specific problems with cold storage. While this applies directly to the Secret Key portion of a key-pair; it also applies to the seed used to back up HD wallets and hardware wallets.
The best way to keep you seed/secret key safe is to have multiple copies in multiple locations perhaps with multiple formats and even better if the keys are split. However not everyone has access to multiple locations, or access to land long term, or more than one place to store their things. This is an examination of faults with individual methods; and not a comprehensive plan, obviously.
Not to say everything is all bad but there are many potential weakness out there, and some in the Bitcoin and crypto community like to know the edge cases of things.
I will also highlight some of the aspects of the Keyois Capsule which is a 'physical bitcoin'.
A physical Bitcoin is a cryptographic key pair, a physical key printed and affixed to what has always been before a coin. The first physical bitcoin coin was the Casascius coin, since then the world of physical bitcoin coins has blossomed as a fun part of the Bitcoin world.
We will focus on mediums relating to cold storage and not ones designed for more everyday use, but this applies to the seed you save to keep your everyday spending wallets safe and backed up.
We will assume you generated your keys securely and that you already have them on some medium. We will also have to ignore endpoint physical security because they can all be carried away the same. Remember your cell phone /hardware wallet/ computer client are only as good as where you put the backup seed phrase, which can be thought of as data much like the SK discussed below.
Written on a piece of paper
Printed on a piece of paper
On laminated paper
Engraved / etched/ ablated/ stamped on a piece of metal
Stored digitally on a computer
Stored digitally on CD, floppy disk, laserdisc, or mini-disc
Stored digitally on a flash drive
Backups are essential for digital data Computer code for performing operations can be corrupted in transfer or in operation. Special systems exist and procedures help data to last longer. For ideas, see this archive.gov page Remember to store in multiple locations. You can lose everything in single structure
A physical bitcoin coin
**What can solve most of these problems? A combination of good backup procedures and encryption. **
If you have permeant access to more than one location (people who live in big cities, without family or cars have a hard time with this) or have people you trust with your money (don't) then look into using some form of Multi-signature option.
The Keyois Capsule is a crypto piggy bank; it can be funded from the outside but you to break it open to get them out. You give me a BIP38 encrypted key pair (well the address not the public key) and I engrave it in this tamper evident and time resistant package. You still have to hold on to the pass phrase that allows you to decrypt it; that is however the same problem as all methods with BIP38 encryption. How to store this without having to trust anyone but still being assured of it's security?
  • Engraving, embossing, or stamping on a sheet of metal is one option; however the metals that are easiest to stamp are ones that melt in a house fire. They could be put in a glass jar that's filled with aerogel and buried. These is the best readily available option for most people but it really can be tedious. - This puts you back at anyone who can see it can steal it so dip in plastic dip, wrap in duct tape, bake in clay, encase in concrete, whatever just don't leave unencrypted keys visible!
  • The cryptosteel is another ready-made option
  • Have the words etched onto glass at home with off the shelf products; but be carful of this idea because the glass can shatter from impact and heat or even sudden temperature changes
  • Anodize the words yourself on a pieces of metal, there used to be a service to help use your home printer to print the words with some chemicals you can buy
  • Bake them in clay, then encase that in epoxy resin so it can't shatter. then paint the outside, in the future you can solvent the paint off and see the written seed
  • Use a combination of techniques to split the seed so that it is safe(because split and separated) and redundant (because backed up).
The most cost effective way for a 'normal' person (without their own land, without more than one location, and who cannot trust anyone else with their funds) to keep their backup seed/ secret key safe from damage from the elements would probably to buy a stamping kit and hammer and some stainless steel sheet or bar, Aluminium can be okay if you have the right alloy but better safe than sorry.
submitted by ProfBitcoin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hi Departments of Financial Services, Here is the proposed Virtual Currency Regulator Application

In developing this regulatory framework, we have sought to strike an appropriate balance that helps protect individuals, consumers, businesses, services, and innovators, while rooting out unscrupulous and over-reaching regulatory activity. These regulations include provisions to help safeguard customer assets, protect against unwarranted account freezes or seizures, and prevent the regulatory abuse of virtual currencies from unethical activity, such as widespread warrantless monitoring, disclosure of private information, dictation as to how users engaged in P2P or non-fiat transfers can spend their money, and scapegoating.
We recognize that not everyone in the regulatory community will be pleased about the prospect of what could be seen as a barrier to their regulatory authority. Ultimately, though, we believe that setting up common sense rules of the road is vital to the long-term future of the virtual currency industry, as well as the safety and soundness of customer assets. (We think the situation in New York, for example, made that very clear.) Moreover, given that P2P decentralized networks are stateless, headless, community consensus driven bodies, we also have a moral obligation to move forward on this framework.
Entities are considered "interested in regulating virtual currencies" if:
... in a manner that would affect any current or prospective member of the human race.
Entities "interested in regulating virtual currencies" must:
As the first decentralized community to put forward specially tailored rules for virtual currency regulators – continued public feedback will be an important part of finalizing this regulatory framework. We look forward to carefully and thoughtfully reviewing public comments on our proposal.
submitted by Try_AgainNY to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

There is a 30 day comment period for the current Bitlicense proposal. Unless there are substantial changes, New York will be a Bitcoin dead zone

The 30 day comment period starts next week. Bitlicense, as proposed will force most companies that store customer BTC deposits to block New York IP addresses. There is very little chance that Lawsky will make any further changes to it, so what will this mean for Bitcoin around the world?
EDIT, as a reminder:
This is how the Bitlicense will affect Bitcoin businesses, taken from here:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/2aycxs/hi_this_is_ben_lawsky_at_nydfs_here_are_the/cizyqyz
(I've added modifications in light of changes in the new proposal and information that I found was missing in the original write-up)
Entities are considered dealing in virtual currencies if:
.. to any resident in New York. Web services, even those incorporated overseas, must either comply or block access for NY users. (200.2n)
Entities 'dealing in virtual currency' must:
Added:
The (only?) good news: Merchants do not need a BitLicense to accept Bitcoin for a good or service. (200.3c2).
> This post was created for general guidance, and does not constitute legal advice. You should not act upon the information contained in this publication without obtaining specific advice from a professional. No representation or warranty (expressed or implied) is given as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this post.
EDIT 2, targetpro suggested expressing any concerns you may have about the proposed regs to the NY Dept. of Finan. Services:
submitted by aminok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

questions about 2011 casascius bitcoin

hello, I have an active 2011 casascius bitcoin. It is the first series with the "casacius" spelling error in the hologram. I discovered recently that this coin has sold for as much as $10,000 on ebay and even saw one listed for $100,000 today. I contacted a coin broker, but said they did not know enough about bitcoin to help me and knew of no one to refer me to. I am now wondering about a couple of things:
*Do I need to have the coin graded and encapsulated? If so do you have recommendations of where to do this?
*I have been storing it in a waterproof pelican case for the last few years, but initially it just sat in a drawer. how much would the condition affect the value? I don't know anything about coins, but I would assume that it is not "mint", even though it looks good to me. I've included a picture for some frame of reference.
*Where would be the best place to sell something like this for USD? I have not used ebay before and am hesitant to have this be the first thing I sell.
I'm sorry if this is similar to questions that have been asked before. I really don't even know exactly what to ask about, I am just looking for any advice on what to do with something that seems to be very valuable at the moment.
Thanks for your help, if there is a better place to post about this please let me know.
http://imgur.com/a/ISQef
submitted by casaciusthrowaway to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

help splitting coin in electrum

Hi, sadly I am planning on peeling my casascius coin soon as selling the actual bitcoin is the only way I feel confident I will not be scammed. I plan to sweep the mini private key into an electrum wallet. Where I am confused is at what point I would split the coin into btc and bch. Is this something I should do during the sweep? Or do I split after the sweep? Once the coin(s) are in my electrum wallet I plan to send a portion of each to my coinbase wallet to sell. I'm just trying to make sure I do things in the most efficient and correct order. Thanks for your help.
submitted by coinsplitter4500 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

My bitcoin value has surpassed my decade long stock account

Throwaway account because I'm revealing more than I want tied to my primary account.
I'll put the TL;DR at the top.
TL;DR: Apparently, I'm well off and 2 years of bitcoins are worth more than 10 years of stock market investment.
I'm nearly 50 years old. A few years out of college and I just barely broke $20k salary. That was worth more than $20k today, but was still a lousy wage with college loan debt. I briefly (1.5 years) had a dotcom job at the turn of the millineum making more than I do now, but I had never had money like that before and boosted the economy instead of putting any aside. I did get some nice toys, though.
Add on another 1.5 years of unemployment, living off my wife's meager salary and a few odd under-the-table jobs, and I finally landed a decent paying job again. Nothing like the dotcom days, but close. However, I'd learned we could live on much less and I wanted a cushion. I dumped tons into my 401k, my savings account and opened a Scottrade account. A little money goes each month to savings and Scottrade.
Roughly ten years later, my 401k is about 3 times my annual income. The Scottrade account is about 30% of it.
Two years ago, I heard about bitcoin on Slashdot. It sounded interesting. I started mining on my son's gaming machine, which meant it was only mining when my son wasn't playing games and if he remembered to start the miner when he was done.
I mined solo for a few days, and quickly joined a mining pool. I was getting a bitcoin every three or four days initially. That didn't last long.
I opened a MtGox account, added some cash and purchased btc almost at the height of the 2011 spike.
I felt like an idiot.
I bought some Casascius coins. I left my MtGox account alone.
This was also around the time the 99% protests were going on. I felt very sympathetic. I remember in reading about the protests, I stumbled across a site that showed what percentage people were based on annual income. With mine and my wife's income, I was above the 90th percentile and below the 95th. I remember the horror and disbelief I felt.
Througout it all, I continued mining. I got lucky during the early 2013 spike and sold some of the MtGox stuff I'd had sitting there. I also got a high end SLR camera at bitcoinstore.com almost at the peak. I was feeling pretty good.
I bought a ButterflyLabs Jalapeno with bitcoins just before that first 2013 spike. I also stopped even trying to mine with a graphics card soon after that because it made no sense. I did eventually get delivery of the Jalapeno. It's earned almost .68 bitcoins. Don't ask what it cost in bitcoins, because I don't remember and I don't want to know.
After realizing my MtGox profits couldn't be pulled out in dollars in any reasonable timeframe, I converted them to bitcoins and pulled them out. I got more bitcoins than I sold them for, but not by much.
So, now I own bitcoins in the high 2 digits, about a third of them are still in physical Casascius coins. I only have an account on MtGox, so I have no real way of converting any of them to cash. I still have $100 sitting in the MtGox account, which I should have converted into bitcoins and pulled out long ago, but I'm frustrated by the premium bitcoins require in USD on MtGox.
For nearly ten years, I've been putting money in my Scottrade account. I saw the collapse in 2008 and mostly held. I bought bank stocks at that time and made a killing. That killing was offset by the REITs I'd invested in before the crash.
In ten years of regular transfers to Scottrade and investment that has gotten better as I've gotten older and more cynical, I've accumulate about 30% of my annual income.
In the last few days, even with the purchase of a cool SLR and the cut involved in Casascius coin purchases, my double-digit bitcoin ownership has now surpassed my Scottrade account in value. I don't have an easy way of converting that bitcoin to USD, but I'm also not concerned about that because I think that easy methods will exist soon.
I fully expect that my bitcoins will be worth less in the near future. However, I believe in the long term, they'll be worth more and that I'll have a number of easier possibilities for converting them to USD if I want to.
I also believe the analogies to the early WWW are flawed. I think analogies to the IP protocol are more apt and that we've only begun to imagine the possibilities.
I'm in it for the long haul. They'll either be worth nothing or much more than now. And, if I add up my electricity costs and the small investment I made during the spike in 2011, I'm still ahead of the game because I have an SLR camera that my wife would never have let me buy with cash.
I'm already ahead of the game and I think the game hasn't even started.
EDIT: Grammar
submitted by throaway419 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Holding a Bitcoin: The First Tangible Bitcoin by Casascius (5 BTC) — worth 300x its weight in gold Casascius Aluminium Physical Bitcoin 2013 Casascius Bitcoin  Physical Bitcoin Revealed: Volume 1 $424 Million and Numismatic Value There's Only 20,000 Casascius Physical Bitcoins Left Unspent 10BTC & 1BTC Casascius Coins - Physical Bitcoins

Casascius, the pen name of Bitcoin user Mike Caldwell, began minting physical Bitcoins in 2011. Each coin came backed by brass, silver, or gold and included the digital Bitcoin(s)’s private key imprinted on the coin’s reverse side. However, during Caldwell’s tenure of making the Casascius physical bitcoin collection, he minted close to 90,000 BTC in various denominations. On July 12, 2020, there’s only 45,760 active BTC held on Casascius physical coins or bars in existence, as there were roughly 46,320 active BTC coins in December 2019. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. Bitcoin is the most widely used open-source peer-to-peer "cryptocurrency" that you can send over the Internet without a bank or a middleman. Each Casascius Bitcoin is a collectible coin backed by real Bitcoins embedded inside. A Casascius coin is the name of a certain type of physical – rather than purely digital — bitcoin. Mike Caldwell, a resident of Sandy, Utah, in the US, first introduced physical bitcoins for

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Holding a Bitcoin: The First Tangible Bitcoin by Casascius (5 BTC) — worth 300x its weight in gold

Physical bitcoins exist; coins minted by numismatic enthusiasts that contain the digital bitcoin within. The most famous physical bitcoin was minted by Casascius from 2011 to 2013 before the the U ... redeeming casascius bitcoin - Duration: 3:25. 15azScMm 9,104 views. 3:25. Making a Bladeless Wooden Fan - Scrapwood Challenge ep38 - Duration: 28:06. Pask Makes Recommended for you. The name casascius is said to be an acronym of “call a spade a spade”. From then on, thousands of physical Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies were created. This is a 2013 Brass Casascius Bitcoin.... The First Physical Bitcoin Had a Typo and Was Worn as Jewelry - Stefan Thomas - Duration: 1:34. CoinDesk 523 views $424 Million and Numismatic Value There's Only 20,000 Casascius Physical Bitcoins Left Unspent *For many years now physical bitcoins have been a very popular trend, but one specific type called ...

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