How to avoid forex trading scams - streetinsider.com

Which is the Fastest forex wire transfer

Hello I need to send €8800 to Germany for blocked account. Which bank does the fastest forex wire transfer in India? I have an account in IDBI Bank, can anyone share their experience with forex wire transfer? The fees and the time taken. Thank you
submitted by vedrajrm to india [link] [comments]

Marina del Rey Man Agrees to Plead Guilty to Wire Fraud Charge that His Forex Trading Business Instead Was $3.3 Million Ponzi Scheme

Marina del Rey Man Agrees to Plead Guilty to Wire Fraud Charge that His Forex Trading Business Instead Was $3.3 Million Ponzi Scheme submitted by JustTheRealNews to JustTheRealNews [link] [comments]

Announcing the Release of the Invictus Margin Lending Fund - Presale Open Now

The Invictus Margin Lending Fund offers investors the ability to take advantage of the volatile nature of the cryptocurrency market without risking direct exposure.
The fund aims to maximize interest income on USD and USD equivalents with zero anticipated drawdown risk. Fund returns have a low or negative correlation to the S&P500, VIX, GLD and TNX — making for an excellent portfolio diversification tool.
The fund will aim to provide investors with exposure to margin lending returns of 13–28% p/a net of fees on USD and various cryptocurrencies backed by, or pegged to the US dollar — such as TUSD (True USD). These are generally referred to as ‘stablecoins’. Average annualized daily rates for USD in this capacity on Bitfinex have been in excess of 16% for the past 12 months from time of publication, recently spiking as high as 40% in the month of July 2019.
A fiat onramp is now available via TUSD, the process is quick and easy and incurs no fees (apart from regular forex/wire charges):
1.) Registration with regulated stablecoin provider Trust Token (TUSD) — https://app.trusttoken.com/signup-or-signin
2.) They will provide wire instructions and ask you to whitelist an ETH address
3.) We will provide you with the ETH deposit address. Once you send the funds, we will receive the TUSD and issue the tokens.
Invictus has been running a fund with these parameters and targets internally for some time with significant success. Today we release the litepaper and officially open the fund, which will operate normally, via SAFTs. The smart contract and token launch will take place by October 2019. The minimum entry for the pre-token phase is $5 000; this restriction will be lifted during the token phase.
Read the full Medium article here, access the litepaper here and apply to participate in the presale here!
submitted by Camaa to cryptotwenty [link] [comments]

Announcing the Release of the Invictus Margin Lending Fund - Presale Open Now

The Invictus Margin Lending Fund offers investors the ability to take advantage of the volatile nature of the cryptocurrency market without risking direct exposure.
The fund aims to maximize interest income on USD and USD equivalents with zero anticipated drawdown risk. Fund returns have a low or negative correlation to the S&P500, VIX, GLD and TNX — making for an excellent portfolio diversification tool.
The fund will aim to provide investors with exposure to margin lending returns of 13–28% p/a net of fees on USD and various cryptocurrencies backed by, or pegged to the US dollar — such as TUSD (True USD). These are generally referred to as ‘stablecoins’. Average annualized daily rates for USD in this capacity on Bitfinex have been in excess of 16% for the past 12 months from time of publication, recently spiking as high as 40% in the month of July 2019.
A fiat onramp is now available via TUSD, the process is quick and easy and incurs no fees (apart from regular forex/wire charges):
1.) Registration with regulated stablecoin provider Trust Token (TUSD) — https://app.trusttoken.com/signup-or-signin
2.) They will provide wire instructions and ask you to whitelist an ETH address
3.) We will provide you with the ETH deposit address. Once you send the funds, we will receive the TUSD and issue the tokens.
Invictus has been running a fund with these parameters and targets internally for some time with significant success. Today we release the litepaper and officially open the fund, which will operate normally, via SAFTs. The smart contract and token launch will take place by October 2019. The minimum entry for the pre-token phase is $5 000; this restriction will be lifted during the token phase.
Read the full Medium article here, access the litepaper here and apply to participate in the presale here!
submitted by Camaa to InvictusCapital [link] [comments]

Transferring money from Canada and Forex rates : wire transfer versus Transferwise

I plan to transfer more than 100000 CAD from India. Indian rupees(INR) to CAD; Indian bank account flat fees+ foreign exchange rate + a flat fee of 15-20 CAD from Canadian bank account. My service fees for both banks are less than 50 CAD ( 1000 INR + 20 CAD + taxes).
Do get a bad exchange rate?YES!!!
Approximately for every 100000 CAD transfers not done through Transferwise I loose 1400 CAD
ICICI Minimal Remittance Service Charge (B) (Inclusive of GST):
Transferwise fees
Missing info
Bottomline
https://www.icicibank.com/nri-banking/money_transfemoney-transfer-rates.page
https://transferwise.com/in/compare/icici-bank-vs-transferwise

Some earlier post in this subreddit concluded that for larger sums wore transfer is better. I think not. Please comment

Bank Exchange rate (INR) Amount INR Amount CAD Fees (INR) -
ICICI to BMO 55.90 559200 10000 1183.00
ICICI to Transferwise 54.3978 559200 0 10207.41 3939.55
Difference 1.5 + 0 207.4 + 2756 -
submitted by 2path47 to PersonalFinanceCanada [link] [comments]

Stronghold USD is the first U.S. dollar settlement vehicle used on IBM World Wire! Here's how we're powering payments and forex globally:

Stronghold USD is the first U.S. dollar settlement vehicle used on IBM World Wire! Here's how we're powering payments and forex globally: submitted by marcslaats to strongholdxchg [link] [comments]

The Great US Stock Investment Platform Fees Debate (Hatch/Stake/Sharesies) - And why it's very situational and there is never one right answer (but it mostly doesn't matter)

So we see pretty regular posts about Hatch vs Stake (and now vs Sharesies) looking at raw fees and returns. I've made posts in the past about Hatch vs Stake fees but the posts have been specific to just the scenario I have entered in the spreadsheet.
There's often a lot of handwaving and speculation about fees and their impact without seemingly providing any math to back up the speculation (common culprits over-exaggerate the impact of the Sharesies annual sub fee).
Bring on the latest spreadsheet iteration - You can change your investment amount, frequency, investment horizon and most importantly number of unique transactions/companies per investment (this heavily influences fees for Hatch).
The "number of unique transactions/companies per investment" means if you are investing into 3 different index funds or companies every time you transfer money, put "3" in here. This is important because Hatch charges a flat rate for every separate purchase.
Modify the blue cells and look at the green cells as the output. There are 3 different Cases so that you can examine the difference in fees unique to your investment strategy.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1JG34jwxa28a8ED-6sqwmDNkWklcaayzC/view
Note that Monthly is 30.5 days whereas Fortnightly is 14 days so using Monthly makes you invest slightly less often.
What is the takeaway from this?
With say 2 or less unique index funds/companies per transaction and a large enough contribution to justify the Hatch flat rate fee (eg say $500 per Transaction), net % fees after withdrawing for all platforms are mostly within 0.5% of each other after withdrawal. So it doesn't really matter what platform you use if your investment strategy is to always buy and hold.
If you expect to do ANY form of Rebalancing, active trading etc then you should probably always pick Stake because there is no fee to do this, but there is fees with Hatch and Sharesies for every transactions. Thus, given the relative very small differences in net fees between all platforms, Stake will end up being quite a bit cheaper. IF the transactions are large and infrequent, Hatch's flat USD$3 transaction fee can largely be irrelevant but again since net fees are similar across the board, there isn't really any reason to (from a fees point of view)
If you are unsure what your future investment activity might be then you should probably just use Stake based on the previous point to allow for future rebalancing/trading/etc, since base case fees (buy and hold) don't really matter across all platforms.
You can skew the returns to be better with Hatch if you invest a lot more money far less frequently, but in doing so you are going against conventional advice of Dollar Cost Averaging and are far more susceptible to market volatility affecting your large, infrequent purchases.
The largest impact of investing in US Stocks/Index Funds will be diversification and minimisation of fund fees rather than worrying about which specific platform you're using. We also don't know what the future will bring in terms of future fees of these companies. Given that the volume of customers for all of these platforms is growing significantly in NZ, fees should probably come down over time (Stake already only charge 0.7% to Aussie customers compared to 1% in NZ) so it becomes even harder to predict 5, 10, 20 years down the track.
Discussion on any thread related to these platforms often devolves into an argument/discussion about fees but I hope to demonstrate that for the most part, for buy-and-hold index fund investors fees don't really matter (in the grand scheme of things). If you are purchasing individual company stocks you are likely to do trading/rebalancing so Stake is usually better.
This is solely looking at this from the point of view of fees, not the actual platform. Discussion around security of these platforms, ease of use, ease of getting company support, etc should be front and centre in these discussions but they rarely are.
submitted by kinnadian to PersonalFinanceNZ [link] [comments]

Gaano ba ka legit ang Etoro?

Recently sa mga nakikita kong pinoy youtubers na nag iinvest, gumagamit sila partly ng Etoro. Pero recently nababasa ko sa Etoro at sa trustpilot ng etoro eh mostly marami issues like bad servers, withdrawal problems, etc. So eto ngayon medyo nagdadalawang isip kaya maghihingi ako ng opinyon niyo.
Nag invest na kasi ako sa Etoro para sa mga stocks na wala sa Pilipinas, ano po ba sa tingin niyo?
submitted by hymaster67 to phinvest [link] [comments]

Not sure what action to take regarding Chinese Forex scam

Hi, I'm usually a lurker on Reddit but I created this throwaway account to ask for any advice and also warn people of this scam.
I'm 99% sure my uncle fell into what I think is very clearly a Forex scam. Now our family is in deep financial troubles. We will need to liquidate all of our assets (including our home, which we live together) to pay off our debts. How it happened:
About a year ago, my uncle is approached on LinkedIn by a women claiming to know the secrets to Forex trading. She claims to be from Hong Kong and sends him several screenshots of her very successful trade and claims she makes millions and also lives an incredibly lavish lifestyle. She tells my uncle to install a 3rd party version of MetaTrader4 to get started. Of course, this gets his attention and he downloads the app and starts taking her advice and plays with the paper money. He makes some really great gains on paper and eventually she pushes him to put in real money.
He then comes to me at the beginning to ask my opinion of this situation.
So I did some initial research and I could not find ANY information about this woman's company and her existence. She literally has less than 10 connections on LinkedIn. I also noted that it was sketchy to download a 3rd party version of this app when a version of it already exists in the App Store. I also reversed image searched her profile pictures but I wasn't able to get any concrete proof she was a scammer.
I tell him that this is most likely a scam based on what I found and his paper money gains on Forex are incredulous and that even pros don't make that much money (He and I have some retail experience trading equities, so we are familiar with the basics).
I don't want him feeling down so I let him know that if he wants to try it maybe he should put in money that he can afford to lose...
Come about half a year later, my uncle confesses that he has all of his savings and on MARGIN into this "forex broker" and that he has been unable to withdraw any money from his account. Each time he doubles his money through trading, he would make another wire transfer to add money to this trading account.
He also tells me each time he tried withdrawing money, the broker requires a lump sum wire transfer of 100k to ensure the right channels are "secured" for him to transfer the money without being targeted by something among the likes of a Hong Kong Security Law. Of course, he gets convinced to make the wire transfer thinking that the gains he makes from the trades offsets this loss...
I should mention that when he calls the "head trader" at this Hong Kong forex firm, it's a young man who speaks Mandarin..
Also I should mention each wire deposit goes to a different account.
Sorry if my writing and organization isn't the best... honestly I am still so shook from writing this... I've convinced my uncle that he should not expect to get any money back from these guys. Our current financial situation is pretty f**ked as I said earlier and we will lose our homes for this. Do you guys have any advice or paths forward we should take? I'm thinking of taking this to a higher authority in Hong Kong but also we don't want to scare the scammer away. We really don't have anything on this scammer as he communicates with us through WeChat. He never answers our calls, and only calls us when we try to withdraw the money.
I appreciate any advice you guys could give me, and I'll be able to answer any question as I may have missed a couple details..
submitted by throwaway920911 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Fees

Guys for international students not in the US is there any way to pay the fees other than Western Union and Flywire ? Does columbia accept SWIFT transactions directly?
submitted by aqidkhat to columbia [link] [comments]

Why China is Pumping China Stocks

Why China is Pumping China Stocks
TLDR: China is actively fighting domestic capital outflows. They are incentivising keeping funds on-shore by pumping the equity markets. Buy large China stocks (BABA, JD).
Inb4 pos or ban
The Economics
China has a fixed exchange rate regime. Blah blah RMB internationalization, blah blah offshore RMB (which is actually settled in US dollars). This places it within line C of the policy trilemma (which says, you can't sustainably have all 3). Since 2005 to about 2017, the government was moving towards free capital mobility because of large amounts of exports which fed the national forex reserves. You bet billions of RMB left China, which the government didn't really like at first because that reduced domestic investment and would contribute to a weaker RMB. Basically, China was trying to do all 3 which works for a short while... until your forex reserves run out.

https://preview.redd.it/g0nwsssoe7f51.png?width=580&format=png&auto=webp&s=0e46b6b2cfa12b351b30ff2c5567c2f9992e99b2

The Current Problem
The trade war has definitely been bad for China. I am going to try and skip politics, but basically foreign exchange reserves have been gapping down (official Chinese data is 100% fake). China is increasingly bellicose as well, which doesn't improve relations with trading partners who also buy with US dollars.
You can't exchange for US dollars anymore. For private citizens, you can only exchange for education purposes or travel . For companies, you need verification of invoices through both SAFE (State Administration of Foreign Exchange) and the tax offices. This used to take 24hrs, but is now taking 2-3 weeks for amounts >$500k. China also has US dollar denominated bank accounts. But unfortunately, you can't take it in cash unless you have the reasons above. Chinese media is also branding holding US dollars as unpatriotic, so I'm afraid my $50k in digital money might be subject to confiscation. If not, it's just fake money (can't take cash or wire out).
China has been brrrrrring to the pace of JPOW. Weapon of choice are muni and local bonds, which have been forced upon local banks. This creates a certain credit problem, but let's not worry about that until later.

https://preview.redd.it/maul8aope7f51.png?width=1200&format=png&auto=webp&s=36dd4665517ec7303b51aa1416517c9e0ea50bef

The Solution
China's pretty smart. All those RMB quotes are fake. You can try to get US dollars, but that is almost impossible now. Anyone who wants to buy RMB, contact me and we'll trade at the current price. So looking at the impossible triangle, free capital mobility has become nonexistent. In order to keep exchange rate stability (to avoid a sudden rush towards the door) and keep printing, free capital mobility needs to be 100% sacrificed.
How do you do that with a population that has seen the west and aspire to get out? You need to keep the money onshore. Thankfully, all Chinese are greedy and the equity markets are full of retailers that pump stocks up or down 10% per day. This is one of the reasons for the early July State Council report calling for everyone to buy stocks. Who's buying? Everyone. And if it drops, the national team takes over.
This creates a powerful incentive to fill the foreign reserves again. Foreigners (funds) would want to get in on the action. They will exchange their dollars for RMB, get those 20% gains, but eventually find out trying to get that money back into USD is impossible.
China has also been strengthening the RMB from 7.10 to 6.96 as of yesterday. Smart, because why would you want to sell an asset that's weakening? This is also a reason why China fears gold rallies - buying gold causes RMB to leave. Happily for the SAFE, some banks have stopped offering their paper gold products.
China will pump its domestic markets. Unless you have a Chinese account, the closest thing you can get to are mega names like Alibaba, JD and Tencent. I would avoid touching too small companies because of LK coffee problems.
Oh yeah the trade war? Well, pussies don't make money.
submitted by 1poundbookingfee to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

[Request] What are the best/fastest news wires or sources available for forex fundamental analysis?

EDIT: Thank you all for your advice! It is greatly appreciated!
submitted by Heart_Of_Dankness to Forex [link] [comments]

2 Ways to Recover Stolen Bitcoin Scammed Crypto and Funds Lost to Binary Options Forex

2 Ways to Recover Stolen Bitcoin Scammed Crypto and Funds Lost to Binary Options Forex

2 Ways to Recover Stolen Bitcoin Scammed Crypto and Funds Lost to Binary Options Forex
I am sharing a link to an article on how to recover stolen bitcoin, scammed crypto, and funds lost to binary options forex. And I must say the article was very helpful. We (my friends and I) actually came across it while looking for a way to recover some bitcoin we lost to a crypto investment scam.
The article was a very helpful guide for my friends and me, and we were able to recover all the bitcoin that were stolen from us.
https://www.streetinsider.com/FMR+Wire/2+Ways+to+Recover+Stolen+Bitcoin+Scammed+Crypto+and+Funds+Lost+to+Binary+Options+Forex/17333870.html
submitted by Babyelijah to u/Babyelijah [link] [comments]

Best way to send money from US to VN on a monthly basis?

I recently moved to the US but my family is still living in VN. I want to send my parents some money every month but not sure if simple bank transfers are the best way for that as it charges international wiring, maybe not too preferable FOREX, etc. How do you do it?
submitted by toastermeoven to VietNam [link] [comments]

Forex Trading in Kenya.

Someone posted on here a few days ago asking about forex and forex trading in Kenya, I have gone through the responses and clearly, most people don’t have an idea. It is 3am in the morning and am in a good mood so let me make this post. This will be a comprehensive and lengthy post so grab a pen and paper and sit down. We’ll be here a while.
FIRST OF ALL, who am I..?
I am a forex trader, in Nairobi, Kenya..i have been actively involved in forex since I found out about it in Feb 2016 when I somehow ended up in a wealth creation seminar (lol) in pride inn Westlands, the one close to Mpaka Rd. Luckily for me, it was not one of those AIM global meetings or I’d be on Facebook selling God knows what those guys sell. I did not take it seriously till August of the same year and I have been active ever since.
I don’t teach, mentor or sell a course or signals, I trade my own money. I am also posting from a throwaway account because I don’t want KRA on my ass.
What the fuck is forex and forex trading.
In simple plain English, forex is like the stock market but for currencies. Stock Market = Shares, forex = currencies. If you want more in-depth explanation, google is your friend.
These currencies are pegged on specific countries, united states- dollar, UK- pound, euro zone- euro, Switzerland- Swiss franc, Kenya- Kenya shilling.. you get the point. Now, there are specific events and happenings between these economies that affect the movement and values of the currencies, driving their value (purchasing power up and down). Forex trading exploits these movements to make money. When the value is going up, we buy and vice versa (down –sell)
Is forex trading illegal in Kenya? Is it a scam?
Illegal, no. scam, no. All the banks in the world do it (KCB made about 4 billion from trading forex in 2019)
Have there been scams involving forex in Kenya?
Yes. Here is one that happened recently. This one is the most infamous one yet. Best believe that this is not the end of these type of scams because the stupidity, greed and gullibility of human beings is unfathomable.
However, by the end of this post, I hope you won’t fall for such silliness.
What next how do I make it work..?
Am glad you asked. Generally, there are two ways to go about it. One, you teach yourself. This is the equivalent of stealing our dad’s car and hoping that the pedal you hit is the brake and not the accelerator. It is the route I took, it is the most rewarding and a huge ego boost when you finally make it on your own. Typically, this involves scouring the internet for hours upon hours going down rabbit holes, thinking you have made it telling all your friends how you will be a millionaire then losing all your money. Some people do not have the stomach for that.
The second route is more practical, structured and smarter.
First Learn the basics. There is a free online forex course at www.babypips.com/learn/forex this is merely an introductory course. Basically it is learning the parts of a car before they let you inside the car.
Second, start building your strategy. By the time you are done with the babypips, you will have a feel of what the forex market is, what interests you, etc. Tip..Babypips has a lot of garbage. It is good for introductory purposes but not good for much else, pick whatever stick to you or jumps at you the first time. Nonsense like indicators should be ignored.
The next step is now the most important. Developing the skill and building your strategy. As a beginner, you want to exhaust your naivety before jumping into the more advanced stuff. Eg can you identify a trend, what is a pair, what is position sizing, what is metatrader 4 and how to operate it, what news is good for a currency, when can I trade, what are the different trading sessions, what is technical analysis, what is market sentiment, what are bullish conditions what is emotion management, how does my psychology affect my trading (more on this later) an I a swing, scalper or day trader etc
Mentors and forex courses.. you have probably seen people advertising how they can teach and mentor you on how to trade forex and charging so much money for it. Somehow it seems that these people are focused on the teaching than the trading. Weird, right..? Truth is trading is hard, teaching not quite. A common saying in the industry is “Those who can’t trade, teach” you want to avoid all these gurus on Facebook and Instagram, some are legit but most are not. Sifting the wheat from the chaff is hard but I did that for you. The info is available online on YouTube, telegram channels etc. am not saying not to spend money on a course, if you find a mentor whose style resonates with you and the course is reasonably priced, please, go ahead and buy..it will cut your learning curve in half. People are different. What worked for me might not work for you.
Here are some nice YouTube channels to watch. These guys are legit..
  1. Sam sieden
  2. Cuebanks
  3. TheCoinFx
  4. The trading channel
  5. Astro
  6. Forex family
  7. Wicksdontlie
Advanced stuff
  1. ICT
After a short period of time, you will be able to sniff out bs teachers with relative ease. You will also discover some of your own and expand the list. Two tips, start with the oldest videos first and whichever of these resonates with you, stick with till the wheels fall off.
How long will it take until things start making sense
Give yourself time to grow and learn. This is all new to you and you are allowed to make mistakes, to fail and discover yourself. Realistically, depending on the effort you put in, you will not start seeing results until after 6 months. Could take longeshorter so there is no guarantee.
Social media, Mentality, Psychology and Books
Online, forex trading might not have the best reputation online because it takes hard work and scammers and gurus give it a bad name. However, try to not get sucked into the Instagram trader lifestyle as it is nowhere close to what the reality is. You will not make millions tomorrow or the day after, you might never even make it in this market. But that is the reality of life. Nothing is promised, nothing is guaranteed.
Your mentality, beliefs and ego will be challenged in this market. You will learn things that will make you blood boil, you will ask yourself daily, how is this possible, why don’t they teach this in school..bla bla bla..it will be hard but growth is painful, if it wasn’t we’d all be billionaires. Take a break, take a walk, drink a glass of whatever you like or roll one..detox. Chill with your girl (or man) Gradually you will develop mental toughness that will set you up for life. Personally, I sorta ditched religion and picked up stoicism. Whatever works for you.
Psychology, this is unfortunately one of the most neglected aspects of your personal development in this journey. Do you believe in yourself? Can you stand by your convictions when everyone is against you? Can you get up every day uncertain of the future? There will be moments where you will question yourself, am I even doing the right thing? the right way? It is normal and essential for your growth. People who played competitive sports have a natural advantage here. Remember the game is first won in your head then on the pitch.
Books: ironically, books that helped me the most were the mindset books, Think and grow rich, trading for a living, 4 hour work week, the monk who sold his Ferrari..just google mindset and psychology books, most trading books are garbage. Watch and listen to people who have made it in the investing business. Ray Dalio, warren, Bill Ackman and Carl Icahn.
This is turning out to be lengthier than I anticipated so I’ll try to be brief for the remaining parts.
Brokers
You will need to open up an account with a broker. Get a broker who is regulated. Australian ones (IC Market and Pepperstone) are both legit, reliable and regulated. Do your research. I’d avoid local ones because I’ve heard stories of wide spreads and liquidity problems. International brokers have never failed me. There are plenty brokers, there is no one size fits all recommendation. If it ain’t broke..don’t fix it.
Money transfer.
All brokers accept wire transfers, you might need to call your bank to authorize that, avoid Equity bank. Stanchart and Stanbic are alright. Large withdrawals $10k+ you will have to call them prior. Get Skrill and Neteller if you don’t like banks like me, set up a Bitcoin wallet for faster withdrawals, (Payoneer and Paypal are accepted by some brokers, just check with them.)
How much money can I make..?
I hate this question because people have perceived ceilings of income in their minds, eg 1 million ksh is too much to make per month or 10,000ksh is too little. Instead, work backwards. What % return did I make this month/ on this trade. Safaricom made 19.5% last year, if you make 20% you have outperformed them. If you reach of consistency where you can make x% per month on whatever money you have, then there are no limits to how much you can make.
How much money do I need to start with..?
Zero. You have all the resources above, go forth. There are brokers who provide free bonuses and withdraw-able profits. However, to make a fulltime income you will need some serious cash. Generally, 50,000 kes. You can start lower or higher but if you need say 20k to live comfortably and that is a 10% return per month, then you can do the math on how big your account should be. Of course things like compound interest come into play but that is dependent on your skill level. I have seen people do spectacular things with very little funds.
Taxes..?
Talk to a lawyer or an accountant. I am neither.
Family? Friends?
Unfortunately, people will not understand why you spend hundreds of hours watching strangers on the internet so it is best to keep it from them. Eventually you will make it work and they will come to your corner talking about how they always knew you’d make it.
The journey will be lonely, make some trading buddies along the way. You’d be surprised at how easy it is when people are united by their circumstances (and stupidity) I have guys who are my bros from South Africa and Lebanon who I have never met but we came up together and are now homies. Join forums, ask questions and grow. That is the only way to learn. Ideally, a group of 5-10 friends committed to learning and growth is the best model. Pushing each other to grow and discovering together.
Forex is real and you can do amazing things with it. It is not a get rich quick scheme. If you want a quick guaranteed income, get a job.
And now it is 5am, fuck.
This is oversimplified and leaves out many many aspects.
Happy to answer any questions.
submitted by ChaliFlaniwaNairobi to Kenya [link] [comments]

Not sure what action to take regarding Chinese Forex scam

Hi, I'm usually a lurker on Reddit but I created this throwaway account to ask for any advice and also warn people of this scam.
I'm 99% sure my uncle fell into what I think is very clearly a Forex scam. Now our family is in deep financial troubles. We will need to liquidate all of our assets (including our home, which we live together) to pay off our debts. How it happened:
About a year ago, my uncle is approached on LinkedIn by a women claiming to know the secrets to Forex trading. She claims to be from Hong Kong and sends him several screenshots of her very successful trade and claims she makes millions and also lives an incredibly lavish lifestyle. She tells my uncle to install a 3rd party version of MetaTrader4 to get started. Of course, this gets his attention and he downloads the app and starts taking her advice and plays with the paper money. He makes some really great gains on paper and eventually she pushes him to put in real money.
He then comes to me at the beginning to ask my opinion of this situation.
So I did some initial research and I could not find ANY information about this woman's company and her existence. She literally has less than 10 connections on LinkedIn. I also noted that it was sketchy to download a 3rd party version of this app when a version of it already exists in the App Store. I also reversed image searched her profile pictures but I wasn't able to get any concrete proof she was a scammer.
I tell him that this is most likely a scam based on what I found and his paper money gains on Forex are incredulous and that even pros don't make that much money (He and I have some retail experience trading equities, so we are familiar with the basics).
I don't want him feeling down so I let him know that if he wants to try it maybe he should put in money that he can afford to lose...
Come about half a year later, my uncle confesses that he has all of his savings and on MARGIN into this "forex broker" and that he has been unable to withdraw any money from his account. Each time he doubles his money through trading, he would make another wire transfer to add money to this trading account.
He also tells me each time he tried withdrawing money, the broker requires a lump sum wire transfer of 100k to ensure the right channels are "secured" for him to transfer the money without being targeted by something among the likes of a Hong Kong Security Law. Of course, he gets convinced to make the wire transfer thinking that the gains he makes from the trades offsets this loss...
I should mention that when he calls the "head trader" at this Hong Kong forex firm, it's a young man who speaks Mandarin..
Also I should mention each wire deposit goes to a different account.
Sorry if my writing and organization isn't the best... honestly I am still so shook from writing this... I've convinced my uncle that he should not expect to get any money back from these guys. Our current financial situation is pretty f**ked as I said earlier and we will lose our homes for this. Do you guys have any advice or paths forward we should take? I'm thinking of taking this to a higher authority in Hong Kong but also we don't want to scare the scammer away. We really don't have anything on this scammer as he communicates with us through WeChat. He never answers our calls, and only calls us when we try to withdraw the money.
I appreciate any advice you guys could give me, and I'll be able to answer any question as I may have missed a couple details..
submitted by throwaway920911 to Scams [link] [comments]

Someone help me with account funding/oppening (europe)

Hello fellow traders, can anyone please help me out with how to fund my IBKR account? I live in Serbia and its almost impossible to open up account with any broker that does options trading, so IBKR accepted my registration, but the problem is, here in Serbia you cant wire foreign currencies from your accout to any account abroad without the provided reciept of services from the reciever (IBKR).
Also I have problem opening up any online bank, because most of them do not accept cliens from Serbia as of yet. I have foreign currencie account in my bank and also mastercard funded with EUR and USD, but IBKR does not accept fransfers from mastercard.
I really want to start trading options because i have experience with paper trading for over 6 months and also I trade forex quite succesfully, and i would love to use some of the most interesting strategies like spreads, and covered calls/puts (the wheel) etc. Simply put i find options far more interesting than forex but thats just a small digresion.
If anyone can help me out please let me know.
submitted by tinmarFF to options [link] [comments]

TransferWise for foreign currency management

Has anyone here used Transferwise (https://transferwise.com/) to deal with foreign currencies? I'm living in the US but frequently get wire transfers in Euros and my bank (BoA) is devouring a huge chunk off the top. My most recent transfer (received payment) was about 10k euros on 8/31 and I lost like $500 of it because it's being converted at like 1.12 when really the euusd rate hasn't been below 1.17 since early august. I called BoA to ask why this discrepancy exists and they said it's due to the rate that the sending bank gives them, which I understand, but that means I have to contact the foreign bank and deal with them which is just annoying and I know they won't change it anyway. I checked on the sending bank's site and it seems they are sending at a rate of about 1.1533 which is closer to the real rate but still about $200 lower than it should be. Looking at Transferwise it seems to imply I can create an account and for a small conversion fee, get much closer to the real forex rate which would mean an extra $300-500/month depending on the size of the payment.
Has anyone used this and if it's not a good solution, how can I keep more of my money? Both sides (receiving and sending) are being shifted significantly from the actual market exchange rate (right now for example the BOA side is converting at 1.1214 for EUR -> USD and costs 1.2449 to go from USD -> EUR...The foreign sign is like 1.15 to go EUR->USD and 1.20 going the other way. Closer, but still not good. The current market rate is actually 1.1856 as we speak).
submitted by sailingsignal to personalfinance [link] [comments]

No, the British did not steal $45 trillion from India

This is an updated copy of the version on BadHistory. I plan to update it in accordance with the feedback I got.
I'd like to thank two people who will remain anonymous for helping me greatly with this post (you know who you are)
Three years ago a festschrift for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri was published by Shubhra Chakrabarti, a history teacher at the University of Delhi and Utsa Patnaik, a Marxist economist who taught at JNU until 2010.
One of the essays in the festschirt by Utsa Patnaik was an attempt to quantify the "drain" undergone by India during British Rule. Her conclusion? Britain robbed India of $45 trillion (or £9.2 trillion) during their 200 or so years of rule. This figure was immensely popular, and got republished in several major news outlets (here, here, here, here (they get the number wrong) and more recently here), got a mention from the Minister of External Affairs & returns 29,100 results on Google. There's also plenty of references to it here on Reddit.
Patnaik is not the first to calculate such a figure. Angus Maddison thought it was £100 million, Simon Digby said £1 billion, Javier Estaban said £40 million see Roy (2019). The huge range of figures should set off some alarm bells.
So how did Patnaik calculate this (shockingly large) figure? Well, even though I don't have access to the festschrift, she conveniently has written an article detailing her methodology here. Let's have a look.
How exactly did the British manage to diddle us and drain our wealth’ ? was the question that Basudev Chatterjee (later editor of a volume in the Towards Freedom project) had posed to me 50 years ago when we were fellow-students abroad.
This is begging the question.
After decades of research I find that using India’s commodity export surplus as the measure and applying an interest rate of 5%, the total drain from 1765 to 1938, compounded up to 2016, comes to £9.2 trillion; since $4.86 exchanged for £1 those days, this sum equals about $45 trillion.
This is completely meaningless. To understand why it's meaningless consider India's annual coconut exports. These are almost certainly a surplus but the surplus in trade is countered by the other country buying the product (indeed, by definition, trade surpluses contribute to the GDP of a nation which hardly plays into intuitive conceptualisations of drain).
Furthermore, Dewey (2019) critiques the 5% interest rate.
She [Patnaik] consistently adopts statistical assumptions (such as compound interest at a rate of 5% per annum over centuries) that exaggerate the magnitude of the drain
Moving on:
The exact mechanism of drain, or transfers from India to Britain was quite simple.
Convenient.
Drain theory possessed the political merit of being easily grasped by a nation of peasants. [...] No other idea could arouse people than the thought that they were being taxed so that others in far off lands might live in comfort. [...] It was, therefore, inevitable that the drain theory became the main staple of nationalist political agitation during the Gandhian era.
- Chandra et al. (1989)
The key factor was Britain’s control over our taxation revenues combined with control over India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its booming commodity export surplus with the world. Simply put, Britain used locally raised rupee tax revenues to pay for its net import of goods, a highly abnormal use of budgetary funds not seen in any sovereign country.
The issue with figures like these is they all make certain methodological assumptions that are impossible to prove. From Roy in Frankema et al. (2019):
the "drain theory" of Indian poverty cannot be tested with evidence, for several reasons. First, it rests on the counterfactual that any money saved on account of factor payments abroad would translate into domestic investment, which can never be proved. Second, it rests on "the primitive notion that all payments to foreigners are "drain"", that is, on the assumption that these payments did not contribute to domestic national income to the equivalent extent (Kumar 1985, 384; see also Chaudhuri 1968). Again, this cannot be tested. [...] Fourth, while British officers serving India did receive salaries that were many times that of the average income in India, a paper using cross-country data shows that colonies with better paid officers were governed better (Jones 2013).
Indeed, drain theory rests on some very weak foundations. This, in of itself, should be enough to dismiss any of the other figures that get thrown out. Nonetheless, I felt it would be a useful exercise to continue exploring Patnaik's take on drain theory.
The East India Company from 1765 onwards allocated every year up to one-third of Indian budgetary revenues net of collection costs, to buy a large volume of goods for direct import into Britain, far in excess of that country’s own needs.
So what's going on here? Well Roy (2019) explains it better:
Colonial India ran an export surplus, which, together with foreign investment, was used to pay for services purchased from Britain. These payments included interest on public debt, salaries, and pensions paid to government offcers who had come from Britain, salaries of managers and engineers, guaranteed profts paid to railway companies, and repatriated business profts. How do we know that any of these payments involved paying too much? The answer is we do not.
So what was really happening is the government was paying its workers for services (as well as guaranteeing profits - to promote investment - something the GoI does today Dalal (2019), and promoting business in India), and those workers were remitting some of that money to Britain. This is hardly a drain (unless, of course, Indian diaspora around the world today are "draining" it). In some cases, the remittances would take the form of goods (as described) see Chaudhuri (1983):
It is obvious that these debit items were financed through the export surplus on merchandise account, and later, when railway construction started on a large scale in India, through capital import. Until 1833 the East India Company followed a cumbersome method in remitting the annual home charges. This was to purchase export commodities in India out of revenue, which were then shipped to London and the proceeds from their sale handed over to the home treasury.
While Roy's earlier point argues better paid officers governed better, it is honestly impossible to say what part of the repatriated export surplus was a drain, and what was not. However calling all of it a drain is definitely misguided.
It's worth noting that Patnaik seems to make no attempt to quantify the benefits of the Raj either, Dewey (2019)'s 2nd criticism:
she [Patnaik] consistently ignores research that would tend to cut the economic impact of the drain down to size, such as the work on the sources of investment during the industrial revolution (which shows that industrialisation was financed by the ploughed-back profits of industrialists) or the costs of empire school (which stresses the high price of imperial defence)

Since tropical goods were highly prized in other cold temperate countries which could never produce them, in effect these free goods represented international purchasing power for Britain which kept a part for its own use and re-exported the balance to other countries in Europe and North America against import of food grains, iron and other goods in which it was deficient.
Re-exports necessarily adds value to goods when the goods are processed and when the goods are transported. The country with the largest navy at the time would presumably be in very good stead to do the latter.
The British historians Phyllis Deane and WA Cole presented an incorrect estimate of Britain’s 18th-19th century trade volume, by leaving out re-exports completely. I found that by 1800 Britain’s total trade was 62% higher than their estimate, on applying the correct definition of trade including re-exports, that is used by the United Nations and by all other international organisations.
While interesting, and certainly expected for such an old book, re-exporting necessarily adds value to goods.
When the Crown took over from the Company, from 1861 a clever system was developed under which all of India’s financial gold and forex earnings from its fast-rising commodity export surplus with the world, was intercepted and appropriated by Britain. As before up to a third of India’s rising budgetary revenues was not spent domestically but was set aside as ‘expenditure abroad’.
So, what does this mean? Britain appropriated all of India's earnings, and then spent a third of it aboard? Not exactly. She is describing home charges see Roy (2019) again:
Some of the expenditures on defense and administration were made in sterling and went out of the country. This payment by the government was known as the Home Charges. For example, interest payment on loans raised to finance construction of railways and irrigation works, pensions paid to retired officers, and purchase of stores, were payments in sterling. [...] almost all money that the government paid abroad corresponded to the purchase of a service from abroad. [...] The balance of payments system that emerged after 1800 was based on standard business principles. India bought something and paid for it. State revenues were used to pay for wages of people hired abroad, pay for interest on loans raised abroad, and repatriation of profits on foreign investments coming into India. These were legitimate market transactions.
Indeed, if paying for what you buy is drain, then several billions of us are drained every day.
The Secretary of State for India in Council, based in London, invited foreign importers to deposit with him the payment (in gold, sterling and their own currencies) for their net imports from India, and these gold and forex payments disappeared into the yawning maw of the SoS’s account in the Bank of England.
It should be noted that India having two heads was beneficial, and encouraged investment per Roy (2019):
The fact that the India Office in London managed a part of the monetary system made India creditworthy, stabilized its currency, and encouraged foreign savers to put money into railways and private enterprise in India. Current research on the history of public debt shows that stable and large colonies found it easier to borrow abroad than independent economies because the investors trusted the guarantee of the colonist powers.

Against India’s net foreign earnings he issued bills, termed Council bills (CBs), to an equivalent rupee value. The rate (between gold-linked sterling and silver rupee) at which the bills were issued, was carefully adjusted to the last farthing, so that foreigners would never find it more profitable to ship financial gold as payment directly to Indians, compared to using the CB route. Foreign importers then sent the CBs by post or by telegraph to the export houses in India, that via the exchange banks were paid out of the budgeted provision of sums under ‘expenditure abroad’, and the exporters in turn paid the producers (peasants and artisans) from whom they sourced the goods.
Sunderland (2013) argues CBs had two main roles (and neither were part of a grand plot to keep gold out of India):
Council bills had two roles. They firstly promoted trade by handing the IO some control of the rate of exchange and allowing the exchange banks to remit funds to India and to hedge currency transaction risks. They also enabled the Indian government to transfer cash to England for the payment of its UK commitments.

The United Nations (1962) historical data for 1900 to 1960, show that for three decades up to 1928 (and very likely earlier too) India posted the second highest merchandise export surplus in the world, with USA in the first position. Not only were Indians deprived of every bit of the enormous international purchasing power they had earned over 175 years, even its rupee equivalent was not issued to them since not even the colonial government was credited with any part of India’s net gold and forex earnings against which it could issue rupees. The sleight-of-hand employed, namely ‘paying’ producers out of their own taxes, made India’s export surplus unrequited and constituted a tax-financed drain to the metropolis, as had been correctly pointed out by those highly insightful classical writers, Dadabhai Naoroji and RCDutt.
It doesn't appear that others appreciate their insight Roy (2019):
K. N. Chaudhuri rightly calls such practice ‘confused’ economics ‘coloured by political feelings’.

Surplus budgets to effect such heavy tax-financed transfers had a severe employment–reducing and income-deflating effect: mass consumption was squeezed in order to release export goods. Per capita annual foodgrains absorption in British India declined from 210 kg. during the period 1904-09, to 157 kg. during 1937-41, and to only 137 kg by 1946.
Dewey (1978) points out reliability issues with Indian agriculutural statistics, however this calorie decline persists to this day. Some of it is attributed to less food being consumed at home Smith (2015), a lower infectious disease burden Duh & Spears (2016) and diversified diets Vankatesh et al. (2016).
If even a part of its enormous foreign earnings had been credited to it and not entirely siphoned off, India could have imported modern technology to build up an industrial structure as Japan was doing.
This is, unfortunately, impossible to prove. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication that India would've united (this is arguably more plausible than the given counterfactual1). Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been nuked in WW2, much like Japan. Had the British not arrived in India, there is no clear indication India would not have been invaded by lizard people, much like Japan. The list continues eternally.
Nevertheless, I will charitably examine the given counterfactual anyway. Did pre-colonial India have industrial potential? The answer is a resounding no.
From Gupta (1980):
This article starts from the premise that while economic categories - the extent of commodity production, wage labour, monetarisation of the economy, etc - should be the basis for any analysis of the production relations of pre-British India, it is the nature of class struggles arising out of particular class alignments that finally gives the decisive twist to social change. Arguing on this premise, and analysing the available evidence, this article concludes that there was little potential for industrial revolution before the British arrived in India because, whatever might have been the character of economic categories of that period, the class relations had not sufficiently matured to develop productive forces and the required class struggle for a 'revolution' to take place.
A view echoed in Raychaudhuri (1983):
Yet all of this did not amount to an economic situation comparable to that of western Europe on the eve of the industrial revolution. Her technology - in agriculture as well as manufacturers - had by and large been stagnant for centuries. [...] The weakness of the Indian economy in the mid-eighteenth century, as compared to pre-industrial Europe was not simply a matter of technology and commercial and industrial organization. No scientific or geographical revolution formed part of the eighteenth-century Indian's historical experience. [...] Spontaneous movement towards industrialisation is unlikely in such a situation.
So now we've established India did not have industrial potential, was India similar to Japan just before the Meiji era? The answer, yet again, unsurprisingly, is no. Japan's economic situation was not comparable to India's, which allowed for Japan to finance its revolution. From Yasuba (1986):
All in all, the Japanese standard of living may not have been much below the English standard of living before industrialization, and both of them may have been considerably higher than the Indian standard of living. We can no longer say that Japan started from a pathetically low economic level and achieved a rapid or even "miraculous" economic growth. Japan's per capita income was almost as high as in Western Europe before industrialization, and it was possible for Japan to produce surplus in the Meiji Period to finance private and public capital formation.
The circumstances that led to Meiji Japan were extremely unique. See Tomlinson (1985):
Most modern comparisons between India and Japan, written by either Indianists or Japanese specialists, stress instead that industrial growth in Meiji Japan was the product of unique features that were not reproducible elsewhere. [...] it is undoubtably true that Japan's progress to industrialization has been unique and unrepeatable
So there you have it. Unsubstantiated statistical assumptions, calling any number you can a drain & assuming a counterfactual for no good reason gets you this $45 trillion number. Hopefully that's enough to bury it in the ground.
1. Several authors have affirmed that Indian identity is a colonial artefact. For example see Rajan 1969:
Perhaps the single greatest and most enduring impact of British rule over India is that it created an Indian nation, in the modern political sense. After centuries of rule by different dynasties overparts of the Indian sub-continent, and after about 100 years of British rule, Indians ceased to be merely Bengalis, Maharashtrians,or Tamils, linguistically and culturally.
or see Bryant 2000:
But then, it would be anachronistic to condemn eighteenth-century Indians, who served the British, as collaborators, when the notion of 'democratic' nationalism or of an Indian 'nation' did not then exist. [...] Indians who fought for them, differed from the Europeans in having a primary attachment to a non-belligerent religion, family and local chief, which was stronger than any identity they might have with a more remote prince or 'nation'.

Bibliography

Chakrabarti, Shubra & Patnaik, Utsa (2018). Agrarian and other histories: Essays for Binay Bhushan Chaudhuri. Colombia University Press
Hickel, Jason (2018). How the British stole $45 trillion from India. The Guardian
Bhuyan, Aroonim & Sharma, Krishan (2019). The Great Loot: How the British stole $45 trillion from India. Indiapost
Monbiot, George (2020). English Landowners have stolen our rights. It is time to reclaim them. The Guardian
Tsjeng, Zing (2020). How Britain Stole $45 trillion from India with trains | Empires of Dirt. Vice
Chaudhury, Dipanjan (2019). British looted $45 trillion from India in today’s value: Jaishankar. The Economic Times
Roy, Tirthankar (2019). How British rule changed India's economy: The Paradox of the Raj. Palgrave Macmillan
Patnaik, Utsa (2018). How the British impoverished India. Hindustan Times
Tuovila, Alicia (2019). Expenditure method. Investopedia
Dewey, Clive (2019). Changing the guard: The dissolution of the nationalist–Marxist orthodoxy in the agrarian and agricultural history of India. The Indian Economic & Social History Review
Chandra, Bipan et al. (1989). India's Struggle for Independence, 1857-1947. Penguin Books
Frankema, Ewout & Booth, Anne (2019). Fiscal Capacity and the Colonial State in Asia and Africa, c. 1850-1960. Cambridge University Press
Dalal, Sucheta (2019). IL&FS Controversy: Centre is Paying Up on Sovereign Guarantees to ADB, KfW for Group's Loan. TheWire
Chaudhuri, K.N. (1983). X - Foreign Trade and Balance of Payments (1757–1947). Cambridge University Press
Sunderland, David (2013). Financing the Raj: The City of London and Colonial India, 1858-1940. Boydell Press
Dewey, Clive (1978). Patwari and Chaukidar: Subordinate officials and the reliability of India’s agricultural statistics. Athlone Press
Smith, Lisa (2015). The great Indian calorie debate: Explaining rising undernourishment during India’s rapid economic growth. Food Policy
Duh, Josephine & Spears, Dean (2016). Health and Hunger: Disease, Energy Needs, and the Indian Calorie Consumption Puzzle. The Economic Journal
Vankatesh, P. et al. (2016). Relationship between Food Production and Consumption Diversity in India – Empirical Evidences from Cross Section Analysis. Agricultural Economics Research Review
Gupta, Shaibal (1980). Potential of Industrial Revolution in Pre-British India. Economic and Political Weekly
Raychaudhuri, Tapan (1983). I - The mid-eighteenth-century background. Cambridge University Press
Yasuba, Yasukichi (1986). Standard of Living in Japan Before Industrialization: From what Level did Japan Begin? A Comment. The Journal of Economic History
Tomblinson, B.R. (1985). Writing History Sideways: Lessons for Indian Economic Historians from Meiji Japan. Cambridge University Press
Rajan, M.S. (1969). The Impact of British Rule in India. Journal of Contemporary History
Bryant, G.J. (2000). Indigenous Mercenaries in the Service of European Imperialists: The Case of the Sepoys in the Early British Indian Army, 1750-1800. War in History
submitted by GaslightEveryone to u/GaslightEveryone [link] [comments]

Paying off a TD Canada US Dollar Credit card with BoA Credit Card

Hello, I am wondering how I can pay off my Canadian TD Canada US Dollar Visa card with my Bank of America Visa card.
My options right now are do a wire transfer from my BoA account to TD Canada us dollar chequing account. But that would require me to pay roughly total of 70 USD for outgoing and incoming fee.
Or I can take some money from my TD Canadian dollar account and FOREX it to my US Dollar Account in canada.
Or is there a way I can "pay" a US dollar account that resides in Canada with my BoA Visa?
submitted by billyb31d to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Immediate Edge Review, Is Immediate Edge SCAM Or Legit Trading App?

Immediate Edge Review, Is Immediate Edge SCAM Or Legit Trading App?

Immediate Edge Review: Is This Crypto Robot Legit or Scam
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Immediate Edge Review
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Withdrawals, user verification, cost of using the app and alternative options

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submitted by EggNecessary9499 to u/EggNecessary9499 [link] [comments]

Wire Transferring From Canada

I have opened up a forex trading account and I have to wire transfer the funds from my bank account to the trading account. My bank, RBC, only allows for a daily limit of $2500 to be wire transferred from the account. I am looking to put about $10,000 or more into my trading account, but it is very frustrating to have to do it $2,500 at a time and to have to pay their transfer fee each time. Any suggestions about how I can easily and hopefully cheaply wire transfer my money in larger quantities?
Thank you
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Making The Most of a Bear Market - YouTube LQDFX Withdrawal $1,480  Forex Trade Recaps - YouTube LMFX bank wire withdrawal January 2019 Forex Basket Trading System Coconut Wire Forex Promo - YouTube

Wire transfers are an electronic funds transfer from one person or institution to another. Wiring money is considered one of the fastest and safest ways to send money internationally and there are many different wire transfer options available. What are the options when wiring money abroad? FOREX.com is a registered FCM and RFED with the CFTC and member of the National Futures Association (NFA # 0339826). Forex trading involves significant risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Full Disclosure. Spot Gold and Silver contracts are not subject to regulation under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act. Vancouver Office. Finex Forex Exchange 1135 W Pender Street Vancouver, BC V6E 2P4 . 604-681-2062 . [email protected] FOREX.com is a registered FCM and RFED with the CFTC and member of the National Futures Association (NFA # 0339826). Forex trading involves significant risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Full Disclosure. Spot Gold and Silver contracts are not subject to regulation under the U.S. Commodity Exchange Act. The main forex trading scams are looming over the Internet, looking for their victims, and having some nasty things in common. Once you learn to detect them, youll be able to trade safely and relaxed.

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Making The Most of a Bear Market - YouTube

We are looking to bring people in with us who have exceptional team-building experience (preferred), Sales & Marketing background, and/or a passion for resid... How to splice wires - how to solder, how to crimp, wire connectors - Duration: 10:01. ... Forex Basket Robot - accurate, low risk robot (ea) - live trading session recorded! LMFX bank wire withdrawal January 2019 just a quick video on the LMFX bank wire withdrawal it took 10 days to receive the international wire from LMFX I do not work for LMFX, so if you have an ... It doesn't have to be all bad. You can absolutely crush it in a bear market, and many No Nonsense Forex traders are doing just that. This video is not for ev... In this video Jay Wayne will show you how to withdraw from LQDFX using bank wire transfer. Jay Wayne will also show you his trade recaps for the week. .....

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