How to Tell if you Have a Bitcoin Miner Virus Crypto ...

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Can Amazon Inspector identify bitcoin mining malware in EC2 instances?

If not is there an appropriate tool from Amazon that can identify such malwares in production instances, especially?
submitted by sirkarthik to aws [link] [comments]

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers

submitted by paulemmanuelng to CoinBase [link] [comments]

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers submitted by paulemmanuelng to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers submitted by paulemmanuelng to btc [link] [comments]

Researchers Detect Ambitious Bitcoin Mining Malware Campaign Targeting 1,000s Daily

Researchers Detect Ambitious Bitcoin Mining Malware Campaign Targeting 1,000s Daily submitted by cryptolobe to cryptolobe [link] [comments]

Researchers Detect Ambitious Bitcoin Mining Malware Campaign Targeting 1,000s Daily

Researchers Detect Ambitious Bitcoin Mining Malware Campaign Targeting 1,000s Daily submitted by Ranzware to BitNewsLive [link] [comments]

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers

Aqua Cybersecurity Detects Ruthless Bitcoin Mining Malware Attempting to Infect Servers submitted by paulemmanuelng to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Database of chrome extensions infested with bitcoin mining malware?

Nowadays it seems like bitcoin mining malware is everywhere; chrome extensions, ads on websites, url's on websites, etc. Does anybody know of a collective incident report or database of chrome extensions(or any browser) that have been compromised?
submitted by shedingbang to chrome [link] [comments]

Cyberbit discovers international airport riddled with Bitcoin-mining malware

Cyberbit discovers international airport riddled with Bitcoin-mining malware submitted by leftok to atbitcoin [link] [comments]

Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong

Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong submitted by SwaggetyAndy to assholedesign [link] [comments]

Is there a database of browser extensions that are(or have been) infested with bitcoin mining malware?

Nowadays it seems like bitcoin mining malware is everywhere; chrome extensions, ads on websites, url's on websites, etc. Does anybody know of a collective incident report or database of chrome extensions(or any browser) that have been compromised?
submitted by shedingbang to Windows10 [link] [comments]

I find bitcoin mining malware (sysclc.exe, updatedg.exe) on my PC. Where it comes from?

Hello!
I noticed a few days ago that something strange is going on my PC. When I'm not moving a mouse for approximately 5 minutes my PC starts to work very hard, buzzing and a fan works very hard. And then if I move the mouse it stops. The buzzing stops as well as fan sound.
I didn't know what it was, but I decided to make a trap for it. I run the Task Manager, sort processes there by CPU and started to wait. After 5 minutes of not moving a mouse the process "updatedg.exe" comes up and it takes 50-60% of CPU power. That's why I heard fan sound and etc.
And started to google what it this. And didn't find so much information. Only 2 topics in Microsoft Community and 1 topic here, on Reddit. They say that it comes from a process "sysclc.exe" which I found in my Autorun in Task Manager. If you right click on this process and choose to go the process location you will open a folder. There you will find some file, most of them are ".dll" files. It is hiding in Roaming folder and the root folder calls "AppContainer". It wants to pretend like some Internet Explorer or Edge files or cache files.
So, I just deleted this folder, but before close the process "sysclc.exe" in Task Manager (not in Autorun, but in "Processes").
And I have a question. Where it comes from? How does it transport mined bitcoins to somewhere. Maybe we can find some common things and will find what actually caused this.

P.S. I have got photos of this processes and the folder, but as I am a new user of Reddit, I think, I can't post a photo.
submitted by virtus15 to techsupport [link] [comments]

BitCoin Mining Malware Removal Help

Hello,
Just this morning we received an alert from our Sophos Cloud Console about an apparent "Troj/Miner-BP" virus that was detected on our Exchange 2010, Windows 2008 R2 server. This is our primary Exchange server in a multi Exchange server (2 total) environment. I believe I've been able to stop the bleeding for now (answer how for those curious towards the bottom), but I'm curious if any of you have any experience with any mining malware like this (Google had hardly any results, and the only results they did come up with are from the last day or two so I'm sure it's a relatively new exploit). Please bear with me while I try to relay all of the information we've gathered about this mining malware - it's slightly confusing and all based on roughly 2 hour's worth of trying to trace this malware's path.
The infected file that Sophos caught was LMS.exe (not lsm.exe which is a legitimate executable) that was being created in the C:\WINDOWS\Fonts\ directory. If you've ever manually browsed to the Fonts directory you know that, whether you have file extensions hidden or not, Windows Explorer only shows the installed Fonts packages, and not the individual .tff files themselves. Because of this, LMS.exe was not visible when browsed to manually on the local server. We were able to see the LMS.exe file when we c$'d from a different server, but because Sophos was continually trying to Quarantine it (it was being auto-regenerated) we weren't ever able to see any Properties of it. So what was auto-recreating the file? A quick look into Task Manager showed that another executable, msiexev.exe (again, not msiexe.exe the legitimate file) was using between 80-90% of the CPU. Going to the Properties of that process led us to the C:\WINDOWS\security\ directory. After killing the process we were able to rename the file to msiexev.exe.old with no issues. However, after 5 minutes or so a new file of the exact same file size, 1,205KB, was created in its place. Rinse and repeat. If we let msiexev.exe run for roughly 15-20 seconds it would again spawn LMS.exe in the Font directory, and again Sophos would begin quarantining it in an endless game of cat and mouse.
By this time the AV scan we had begun roughly 30 minutes prior quarantined another executable - this time right on the root of the C:\WINDOWS\ directory. This executable was called wmsa.exe, and the timestamp was only 1 minute different (1:07 PM) than the timestamp of the original msiexev.exe (1:08 PM) Tuesday afternoon. This file was easily deleted, and has not been recreated since.
We were able to stop the process from spinning up again by creating a blank file named msiexev.exe in the C:\WINDOWS\security\ directory, giving a domain account ownership of the file, and then removing all Security permissions on the file. Since that time the malware appears unable to execute.
My questions is - has anyone else been faced with this malware? It appears that it is BitCoin mining malware. From the little documentation online I've been able to find it appears to be an exploit that's only vulnerable on Windows Server 2008 R2 boxes with Exchange 2010. If anyone else has any ideas on ways to prevent this or plug this hole I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks!
UPDATE: So after gettting up to the latest patch level (we were patched to the 17th when the infection happened) and having LMS.exe sitting in Quarantine waiting to be cleaned up on the next restart, we scheduled a planned reboot last night at 9 PM. After system restart we found the Sophos detected the malware was attempting to execute again sigh. We also located a new executable in C:\WINDOWS\prefetch\ labeled wuauser.exe along with two text files, history.txt and id.txt. Each of these text files contained a unique 32 character hex code, and nothing else. For those of you that legitimately mine BitCoin - are they relevant to anything? These files are all timestamped either 1:07 or 1:08 Tuesday afternoon, again, matching the time we believe we were initially infected.
We applied our "fix" to these files where we made a domain user the Owner of a blank file that was named identically and then removed all file permissions to them in hopes that they are unable to be regenerated. We also applied this same logic to the LMS.exe file in C:\WINDOWS\Fonts.
After doing all of this our AV console finally has marked that LMS.exe has been "cleaned up" and not just quarantined. I'm hopeful that this has stopped the spread/execution of this malware, but I'm still leery that the underlying exploit that got this installed on our system in the first place is still vulnerable. We'll continue monitoring over the weekend, and if there are any other major updates I'll be sure to update the thread.
submitted by willowshole5 to techsupport [link] [comments]

Ronen rabinovich from cyberbit explains why malicious bitcoin mining malware is increasing on industrial control systems.

Ronen rabinovich from cyberbit explains why malicious bitcoin mining malware is increasing on industrial control systems. submitted by RonaldvanderMeer to security [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong /r/assholedesign

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong /assholedesign submitted by SimilarAdvantage to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

BitCoin Mining Malware Removal Help (X-Post from /r/Techsupport)

Hello,
Just this morning we received an alert from our Sophos Cloud Console about an apparent "Troj/Miner-BP" virus that was detected on our Exchange 2010, Windows 2008 R2 server. This is our primary Exchange server in a multi Exchange server (2 total) environment. I believe I've been able to stop the bleeding for now (answer how for those curious towards the bottom), but I'm curious if any of you have any experience with any mining malware like this (Google had hardly any results, and the only results they did come up with are from the last day or two so I'm sure it's a relatively new exploit). Please bear with me while I try to relay all of the information we've gathered about this mining malware - it's slightly confusing and all based on roughly 2 hour's worth of trying to trace this malware's path.
The infected file that Sophos caught was LMS.exe (not lsm.exe which is a legitimate executable) that was being created in the C:\WINDOWS\Fonts\ directory. If you've ever manually browsed to the Fonts directory you know that, whether you have file extensions hidden or not, Windows Explorer only shows the installed Fonts packages, and not the individual .tff files themselves. Because of this, LMS.exe was not visible when browsed to manually on the local server. We were able to see the LMS.exe file when we c$'d from a different server, but because Sophos was continually trying to Quarantine it (it was being auto-regenerated) we weren't ever able to see any Properties of it. So what was auto-recreating the file? A quick look into Task Manager showed that another executable, msiexev.exe (again, not msiexe.exe the legitimate file) was using between 80-90% of the CPU. Going to the Properties of that process led us to the C:\WINDOWS\security\ directory. After killing the process we were able to rename the file to msiexev.exe.old with no issues. However, after 5 minutes or so a new file of the exact same file size, 1,205KB, was created in its place. Rinse and repeat. If we let msiexev.exe run for roughly 15-20 seconds it would again spawn LMS.exe in the Font directory, and again Sophos would begin quarantining it in an endless game of cat and mouse. By this time the AV scan we had begun roughly 30 minutes prior quarantined another executable - this time right on the root of the C:\WINDOWS\ directory. This executable was called wmsa.exe, and the timestamp was only 1 minute different (1:07 PM) than the timestamp of the original msiexev.exe (1:08 PM) Tuesday afternoon. This file was easily deleted, and has not been recreated since.
We were able to stop the process from spinning up again by creating a blank file named msiexev.exe in the C:\WINDOWS\security\ directory, giving a domain account ownership of the file, and then removing all Security permissions on the file. Since that time the malware appears unable to execute.
My questions is - has anyone else been faced with this malware? It appears that it is BitCoin mining malware. From the little documentation online I've been able to find it appears to be an exploit that's only vulnerable on Windows Server 2008 R2 boxes with Exchange 2010. If anyone else has any ideas on ways to prevent this or plug this hole I'm open to suggestions.
Thanks!
Edit: Formatting
submitted by willowshole5 to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong /r/assholedesign

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Idle Bitcoin mining malware won't let you uninstall it without solving a CAPTCHA - and then fails to uninstall by pretending you typed it in wrong /assholedesign submitted by cryptoanalyticabot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Could someone confirm that the steam_api64.dll commonly identified as a bitcoin mining malware in the skidrow releases is a false-positive?

also can i use a clean steam_api64.dll from another game? i once used the Prey steam_api on Deus Ex: Mankind Divided (Deus Ex's crack was infected) and it actually ran, but then i used it again on Street Fighter collection and the game start a white screen and crashes to desktop, don't know if it was the crack or the game.
submitted by Cell91 to PiratedGames [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Malware removal?

Hey guys! I'm new here, and I really need help. So I downloaded an infected program, that contained Bitcoin Miners. Malwarebytes quarantined them, but 5 mins later quarentine was empty. So I searched one by one of the contamined .exe files (winnetsvces.exe and mswinlib.exe), and deleted them from Registry (before I came to this, I tried all antivirus possible). I'm an absolute noob when it comes to computers, and Reddit always saves me, but I found nothing this time. My PC is not running any weird services that slows it down, but it is overheating, so I guess I'm not safe yet. I think malwarebytes missed a couple of other infected .exe files and I have no clue on how to get mt PC back to normal! Apart from that, malwarebytes found "Trojan.Agent" on HKLM\SYSTEM\CURRENTCONTROLSET\SERVICES\SysLinkMapper. This also disappeared from quarantine, but i have no idea what it is or how to clean it up. Please, help!
Thank you :)
PS: this is my first post, sorry if I did anything wrong
submitted by IrineiaRed to techsupport [link] [comments]

Android Wallpaper Apps Found to Contain Bitcoin-mining Malware

Android Wallpaper Apps Found to Contain Bitcoin-mining Malware submitted by Sourorange12 to Android [link] [comments]

Can bitcoin mining malware (or any malware for that matter) hog your bandwidth without appearing in the windows resource monitor?

i've having problems with my bandwidth lately, and i'm not sure it's because of my isp (it's a 1Mbps ADSL) or a problem of some sort malware, i ran a scan with windows defender and it turned out a couple of threats, one of them was some game's crack while the other was something named Brocoiner. Anyways when i check the network resource monitor, i don't find any app that uses anymore than a few Bytes of bandwidth.
submitted by Cell91 to techsupport [link] [comments]

eSports organization ESEA served class action lawsuit over bundling their player clients with bitcoin mining malware

eSports organization ESEA served class action lawsuit over bundling their player clients with bitcoin mining malware submitted by Clbull to starcraft [link] [comments]

Alert! New Mining PC Virus How to diagnose and remove a bitcoin miner trojan - YouTube 7 DAY$-24/HR$ - BITCOIN MINING EXPERIMENT - See How Much ... How to Remove BitcoinMiner Malware from Your PC How to Remove BitcoinMiner

"The malware uses the computer as a proxy station to send blackmail emails to users, and uses the CPU for monero mining. To maintain a low profile, the malware will use only 50% of the CPU's ... Bitcoin mining malware is made to infect your cryptocurrencies. This type of malware basically runs different processes in your machine and uses significant amount of over-usage of resources. Detection of Bitcoin Mining Malware on Your PC. Detection of Bitcoin Mining Malware can be done with followig methods: Malware actors try to implement a Bitcoin mining virus into everything they do, be it backdoors, viruses, ransomware, adware and redirects. BitCoin miner virus or BitCoin mining virus is a dangerous malware that may use your CPU and/or GPU to obtain BitCoin cryptocurrency by mining illegally. Fileless malware is turning out to be a major threat in the cyber security domain, and it will not go away anytime soon. Bitcoin miner malware is one of the latest additions of this malicious software landscape, and it comes with a significant risk for your device. The primary goal of this malware is to automatically mine cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin by running several processes on the ... The malware, CryptoCurrency Clipboard Hijackers (which reportedly manages 2.3 million bitcoin addresses) switches addresses used to transfer cryptocoin with ones the malware controls - thus ...

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Alert! New Mining PC Virus

How to manually remove these little performance ruining bastards. These things are becoming the new epidemic. Most anti viruses don't detect them because the... BitcoinMiner is a Malware that was designed to force your computer to mine crypto-currency that is called Bitcoin. When the Bitcoins have been mined on the computer’s system, the designer of ... BitcoinMiner is a Malware created with the intent to force your computer to mine crypto-currency called Bitcoin. After Bitcoins have been mined in your system, the cyber currency is then sent to ... 👍 Watch how to remove a hidden Bitcoin mining virus from your computer. If you noticed that your computer – while you’re not using it - still behaves as if i... This video goes over my 7 day 1 week Bitcoin Mining experiment. I let my computer Mine for Bitcoin for a week straight, to see how much money I could generat...

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